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Medical Dictionary - Dictionary of Medicine and Human Biology


Medical Dictionary


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basometachromophil, basometachromophile (ba′so-met-a-kro′mo-fil, -fil)
Staining metachromatically with a basic dye. See metachromasia.

basopenia (ba-so-pe′ne-a)
SYN: basophilic leukopenia. [baso- + G. penia, poverty]

basophil, basophile (ba′so-fil, -fil)
1. A cell with granules that stain specifically with basic dyes. 2. SYN: basophilic. 3. A phagocytic leukocyte of the blood characterized by numerous basophilic granules containing heparin and histamine and leukotrines; except for its segmented nucleus, it is morphologically and physiologically similar to the mast cell though they originate from different stem cells in the bone marrow. [baso- + G. phileo, to love] tissue b. SYN: mast cell.

basophilia (ba-so-fil′e-a)
1. A condition in which there are more than the usual number of basophilic leukocytes in the circulating blood (basophilic leukocytosis) or an increase in the proportion of parenchymatous basophilic cells in an organ (in the bone marrow, basophilic hyperplasia). 2. A condition in which basophilic erythrocytes are found in circulating blood, as in certain instances of leukemia, advanced anemia, malaria, and plumbism. SYN: Grawitz b.. 3. The reaction of immature erythrocytes to basic dyes whereby the cells appear blue or contain bluish granules. SYN: basophilism. Grawitz b. SYN: b. (2) . punctate b. SYN: stippling (1) .

basophilic (ba′so-fil′ik)
Denoting tissue components having an affinity for basic dyes. SYN: basophil (2) , basophile.

basophilism (ba-sof′i-lizm)
SYN: basophilia. Cushing b. SYN: Cushing syndrome. Cushing pituitary b. SYN: Cushing disease.

basophilocyte (ba-so-fil′o-sit)
SYN: basophilic leukocyte.

basoplasm (ba′so-plazm)
That part of the cytoplasm that stains readily with basic dyes.

Bassen
Frank A., U.S. physician, *1903. See B.-Kornzweig syndrome.

Bassini
Edoardo, Italian surgeon, 1844–1924. See B. operation, B. herniorrhaphy.

Bassler
Anthony, U.S. physician, 1874–1959. See B. sign.

bassorin (bas′or-in)
The insoluble portion (60 to 70%) of tragacanth that swells to form a gel; it contains complex methoxylated acids, particularly bassoric acid.

Bastedo
Walter A., U.S. physician, 1873–1952. See B. sign.

bastokinin
SYN: uteroglobin.

bat
A member of the mammalian order Chiroptera. [M.E. bakke] vampire b. a member of the genus Desmodus; an important reservoir host of rabies virus in Central and South America.

bath
1. Immersion of the body or any of its parts in water or any other yielding or fluid medium, or application of such medium in any form to the body or any of its parts. 2. Apparatus used in giving a b. of any form, qualified according to the medium used, the temperature of the medium, the form in which the medium is applied, the medicament added to the medium, or according to the part bathed. 3. Fluid used for maintenance of metabolic activities or growth of living organisms, e.g., cells derived from body tissue. [A.S. baeth] colloid b. a b. prepared by adding soothing agents such as sodium bicarbonate or oatmeal to the b. water to relieve skin irritation and pruritus. contrast b. a b. in which a part is immersed in hot water for a period of a few minutes and then in cold, the hot and cold periods alternated regularly at intervals, usually half-hours; used to increase the blood flow to the part. douche b. the local application of water in the form of a large jet or stream. dousing b. a luminous electric hot air b. given at a very high temperature. electric b., electrotherapeutic b. 1. a b. in which the medium is charged with electricity; SYN: hydroelectric b.. 2. therapeutic application of static electricity, with the patient placed on an insulated platform. Greville b. an obsolete treatment with nonluminous electric hot air given at a very high temperature. hafussi b. a modification of the Nauheim treatment, with only the hands and feet of the patient being immersed in hot water through which carbon dioxide gas is made to pass. [Ger. hand, hand, + fuss, foot] hydroelectric b. SYN: electric b. (1) . immersion b. a therapeutic b. in which the whole person or a body part is totally immersed in the therapeutic substance. light b. therapeutic exposure of the skin to radiant light. Nauheim b. SYN: Nauheim treatment. needle b. a b. in which water is projected forcibly against the body in many very fine jets. oil b. in chemistry, a vessel containing oil, in which a container holding a substance to be heated or evaporated can be immersed. sand b. in chemistry, an arrangement whereby a substance to be treated is in a vessel protected from the direct action of fire by a layer of sand. sitz b. immersion of only the perineum and buttocks, with the legs being outside the tub. [Ger. sitzen, to sit] water b. in chemistry, a vessel containing water, in which a container holding a substance to be heated or evaporated can be immersed.

batho-
Depth. SEE ALSO: bathy-. [G. bathos, depth]

bathochromic (bath-o-kro′mik)
Denoting the shift of an absorption spectrum maximum to a longer wavelength. Opposite of hypsochromic. [batho- + G. chroma, color]

bathoflore (bath′o-flor)
An atom or group of atoms that, by its presence in a molecule, shifts the latter's fluorescent radiation in the direction of longer wavelength, or reduces the fluorescence. Cf.:auxoflore.

bathophobia (bath-o-fo′be-a)
Morbid fear of deep places or of looking into them. [G. bathos, depth, + phobos, fear]

bathy-
Depth. SEE ALSO: batho-. [G. bathys, deep]

bathyanesthesia (bath′e-an-es-the′ze-a)
Loss of deep sensibility, i.e., from muscles, ligaments, tendons, bones, and joints. [G. bathys, deep, + an- priv. + aisthesis, sensation]

bathycardia (bath-e-kar′de-a)
A condition in which the heart occupies a lower position than normal but is fixed there, as distinguished from cardioptosia. [G. bathys, deep, + kardia, heart]

bathyesthesia (bath′e-es-the′ze-a)
General term for all sensation from the tissues beneath the skin, i.e., muscles, ligaments, tendons, bones and joints. SEE ALSO: myesthesia. SYN: deep sensibility. [G. bathys, deep, + aisthesis, sensation]

bathygastry (bath-e-gas′tre)
SYN: gastroptosis. [G. bathys, deep, + gaster, stomach]

bathyhyperesthesia (bath-e-hi′per-es-the′ze-a)
Exaggerated sensitiveness of deep structures, e.g., muscular tissue. [G. bathys, deep, + hyper, above, + aisthesis, sensation]

bathyhypesthesia (bath-e-hip′es-the′ze-a)
Impairment of sensation in the structures beneath the skin, e.g., muscle tissue. [G. bathys, deep, + hypo, under, + aisthesis, sensation]

Batista
Randas, 20th century Brazilian cardiac surgeon. See B. procedure.

batrachotoxin (ba-tra-ko-tok′sin)
A neurotoxin from the Colombian arrow poison frogs (Phyllobates spp.). It is nontoxic when ingested. If it is injected or if there are ulcers present, it will cause an irreversible increase in permeability of sodium ions in nerve membrane, producing paralysis; used in experimental pharmacologic studies of neuromuscular transmission. [G. batrachos, frog, + toxin]

Batson
Oscar V., U.S. otolaryngologist, 1894–1979. See B. plexus, Carmody-B. operation.

Batten
Frederick E., British ophthalmologist, 1865–1918. See B.-Mayou disease, B. disease.

battery (bat′er-e)
A group or series of tests administered for analytic or diagnostic purposes. [M.E. batri, beaten metal, fr. O.Fr. batre, to beat] Halstead-Reitan b. a b. of neuropsychological tests (category test, tactual performance test, Seashore test, speech sounds perception test, finger oscillation test, trail-making test, dynamometer to measure strength of grip) used to study brain-behavior functions including determining the effects of brain damage on behavior. SYN: Tactual Performance Test.

Battle
William H., English surgeon, 1855–1936. See B. sign.

Bauer
Hans, 20th century German anatomist. See B. chromic acid leucofuchsin stain.

Bauer
Walter, U.S. internist, *1898. See B. syndrome.

Bauhin
Gaspard, Swiss anatomist, 1560–1624. See B. gland, B. valve.

Baumé
Antoine, French chemist and pharmacist, 1728–1804. See Baumé scale.

Baumès symptom
See under symptom.

Baumgarten
Paul Clemens von, German pathologist, 1848–1928. See B. veins, under vein, Cruveilhier-B. disease, Cruveilhier-B. murmur, Cruveilhier-B. sign, Cruveilhier-B. syndrome.

bay (ba)
1. In anatomy, a recess containing fluid. 2. Especially, the lacrimal b.. celomic b. 1. medial and lateral recesses at either side of the urogenital mesentery of the embryo; 2. superior recess of the vestibule of the lesser peritoneal space; with the formation of the diaphragm, a portion of the right recess is cut off and becomes the infracardiac bursa; the portion below the diaphragm becomes the superior recess of the lesser peritoneal sac; the left recess is lost. SYN: pneumatoenteric. lacrimal b. SYN: lacrimal lake.

bayberry bark (ba′ber-e)
SYN: myrica.

Bayes
Thomas, British mathematician, 1702–1761. See B. theorem.

Bayle
Antoine L.J., French physician, 1799-1858.

Bayley
Nancy, U.S. psychologist, *1899. See B. Scales of Infant Development, under scale.

baylisascariasis (ba-le-sas′kar-i-a-sis)
The disease caused by nematode parasites of the genus Baylisascaris; migrating larvae of the raccoon parasite B. procyonis can cause a severe disease of the central nervous system in a variety of wild and domestic animal species and, rarely, in humans; human disease has been manifested as either a fatal eosinophilic meningoencephalitis or a diffuse unilateral subacute neuroretinitis.

Baylisascaris (Bay-lis-as′ka-ris)
A genus of ascarid nematodes found in the intestine of mammals. B. procyonis a large roundworm commonly found in raccoons; has been the cause of human visceral larva migrans and ocular larva migrans, following accidental ingestion of embryonated B. procyonis eggs in feces of infected raccoons. SEE ALSO: visceral larva migrans.

bayonet (ba-o-net′)
An instrument having a blade or nib that is offset and parallel to the shaft. [Fr. bayonette, fr. Bayonne, France, where first made]

Bazett
Henry C., English cardiologist, *1885. See B. formula.

Bazex
A., 20th century French physician. See B. syndrome.

Bazin
Antoine P.E., French dermatologist, 1807–1878. See B. disease.

BBB
Abbreviation for blood-brain barrier.

BBC
Abbreviation for bromobenzylcyanide.

BBOT
Abbreviation for 2,5-bis(5-t-butylbenzoxazol-2-yl)thiophene, a liquid scintillator.

BCG
Abbreviation for bacille Calmette-Guérin; ballistocardiograph.

BCL-2
An oncogene that inhibits apoptosis.

BCNU
SYN: carmustine.

bdellin (del′in)
One of a group of protease inhibitors from the leech. [G. bdella, leech, + -in]

Bdellovibrio


B.D.S.
Abbreviation for Bachelor of Dental Surgery.

B.D.Sc.
Abbreviation for Bachelor of Dental Science.

Be
Symbol for beryllium.

beaded (bed′ed)
1. Marked by numerous small rounded projections, often arranged in a row like a string of beads. 2. Applied to a series of noncontinuous bacterial colonies along the line of inoculation in a stab culture. 3. Denoting stained bacteria in which more deeply stained granules occur at regular intervals in the organism.

beading (be′ding)
1. Numerous small rounded projections, often in a row like a string of beads. 2. The rounded elevation along the border of the tissue surface of the major connectors of a maxillary dental prosthesis. 3. Protection of the formed borders of final impressions for a dental prosthesis done by placement of wax sticks or a plaster-pumice combination adjacent to the borders prior to forming the master cast. b. of the ribs SYN: rachitic rosary.

beak (bek)
1. The nose of pliers used in dentistry for contouring and adjusting wrought or cast metal dental appliances. 2. Sometimes used to describe a b.-shaped anatomic structure. See rostrum. [L. beccus]

beaker (be′ker)
A thin glass vessel, with a lip (beak) for pouring, used as containers for liquids.

Beale
Lionel S., British physician, 1828–1906. See B. cell.

beam (bem)
1. Any bar whose curvature changes under load; in dentistry, frequently used instead of “bar.” 2. A collimated emission of light or other radiation, such as an x-ray b.. [O.H.G. Boum] Balkan b. SYN: Balkan frame. cantilever b. in dentistry, a b. that is supported by only one fixed support at only one of its ends. continuous b. in dentistry, a b. that continues over three or more supports, those supports not at the b. ends being equally free supports. electron b. a form of radiation used principally in superficial radiotherapy. See betatron. restrained b. in dentistry, a b. that has two or more supports, at least one of which permits some freedom of rotation to the point of support but not as much as if the support were a free support. simple b. in dentistry, a straight b. that has only two supports, one at either end.




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