|| ANATOMY || DISEASES || DRUGS || HEALTH TOPICS || USA HEALTH STATS || CHINA HEALTH STATS || GENOMICS || LABORATORY MICE || LUPUS ||
Medical Dictionary banner
Medical Dictionary - Dictionary of Medicine and Human Biology


Medical Dictionary


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


gerodontics, gerodontology (jar-o-don′tiks, -don-tol′o-je)
SYN: dental geriatrics. [gero- + G. odous, tooth]

geromarasmus (jar′o-ma-raz′mus)
SYN: senile atrophy. [gero- + G. marasmos, a wasting]

gerontal (jar-on′tal)
Relating to old age.

gerontine (jar′on-ten)
SYN: spermine.

geronto-
See gero-.

gerontologist (jar-on-tol′o-jist)
One who specializes in gerontology.

gerontology (jar-on-tol′o-je)
The scientific study of the process and problems of aging. SYN: geratology. [geronto- + G. logos, study]

gerontophilia (jar′on-to-fil′e-a)
Morbid love for old persons. [geronto- + G. philos, fond]

gerontophobia (jar′on-to-fo′be-a)
Morbid fear of old persons. [geronto- + G. phobos, fear]

gerontotherapeutics (jar-on′to-thar-a-pu′tiks)
The science concerned with treatment of the aged.

gerontotherapy (jar-on′to-thar-a-pe)
Treatment of disease in the aged. SYN: geriatric therapy.

gerontoxon (jar′on-tok′son)
SYN: arcus senilis. [geronto- + G. toxon, bow]

Gerota
Dimitru, Roumanian anatomist and surgeon, 1867–1939. See G. capsule, G. fascia, G. method.

Gersh
Isidore, U.S. histologist, *1907. See Altmann-G. method.

Gerstmann
Josef, Austrian neurologist, 1887–1969. See G. syndrome, G.-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome.

gestagen (jes′ta-jen)
Inclusive term used to denote any one of several gestagenic substances, which are usually steroid hormones. SYN: gestin, progestin (3) .

gestagenic (jes-ta-jen′ik)
Inducing progestational effects in the uterus.

gestalt (ge-stahlt)
A perceived entity so integrated as to constitute a functional unit with properties not derivable from its parts. See gestaltism. [Ger. shape]

gestaltism (ge-stahlt′izm)
The theory in psychology that the objects of mind come as complete forms or configurations which cannot be split into parts; e.g., a square is perceived as such rather than as four discrete lines. [see gestalt]

gestation (jes-ta′shun)
SYN: pregnancy. [L. gestatio, from gesto, pp. gestatus, to bear]

gestin (jes′tin)
SYN: gestagen.

gestosis, pl .gestoses (jes-to′sis, -sez)
Any disorder of pregnancy. [L. gesto, to carry, to bear, + G. -osis, condition]

gesture (jes′chur)
1. Any movement expressive of an idea, opinion, or emotion. 2. An act. [L. gestus, movement, g.] suicide g. an apparent attempt at suicide by someone wishing to attract attention, gain sympathy, or achieve some goal other than self-destruction.

Gey
George O., U.S. physician and researcher, 1899–1970. See G. solution.

GFR
Abbreviation for glomerular filtration rate.

GH
Abbreviation for growth hormone.

GHB
Abbreviation for γ-hydroxybutyrate.

ghee (ge)
A clarified butter in India made from cow or buffalo milk that has been coagulated before churning; used as an emollient, a dressing for wounds, and a food. [Eng. spelling of Hind. ghi]

Ghon
Anton, Czechoslovakian pathologist, 1866–1936. See G. complex, G. focus, G. primary lesion, G. tubercle.

ghost (gost)
A hemoglobin-depleted erythrocyte that has also lost most, if not all, of its internal proteins.

GHRF, GH-RF
Abbreviation for growth hormone-releasing factor.

GHRH, GH-RH
Abbreviation for growth hormone-releasing hormone.

GHz
Abbreviation for gigahertz, equal to one billion (109) hertz; used in ultrasound.

GI
Abbreviation for gastrointestinal; Gingival Index.

Giacomini
Carlo, Italian anatomist, 1841–1898. See band of G., frenulum of G., uncus band of G..

Giannuzzi
Italian anatomist, 1839–1876. See G. crescents, under crescent, G. demilunes, under demilune.

Gianotti
F., 20th century Italian dermatologist. See G.-Crosti syndrome.

giantism (ji′an-tizm)
SYN: gigantism.

Giardia (je-ar′de-a)
A genus of parasitic flagellates that parasitize the small intestine of many mammals, including most domestic animals and humans; e.g., G. bovis in cattle, G. canis in dogs, and G. cati in cats. Many species have been described, but recent workers have suggested that these should be reduced to only two or three. [Alfred Giard, Fr. biologist, 1846–1908] G. intestinalis SYN: G. lamblia. G. lamblia a flattened, heart-shaped organism (10–20 μm in length) with 8 flagella; it attaches itself to the intestinal mucosa by means of a pair of sucking organs; it is usually asymptomatic except in heavy infections, when it may interfere with absorption of fats and produce flatulence, steatorrhea, and acute discomfort; it is the common species of G. in man, but is also found in pigs. SYN: G. intestinalis.

giardiasis (je-ar-di′a-sis)
Infection with the protozoan parasite Giardia; Giardia lamblia may cause diarrhea, dyspepsia, and occasionally malabsorption in humans. SYN: lambliasis.

gibberellic acid (jib′er-el-ik)
An auxin, i.e., a plant hormone which stimulates growth; most prominent of the plant-growth-promoting metabolites of Gibberella fujikuroi. Used as a plant growth regulator and promoter, especially the growth of seedlings. Used also as a food additive in the malting of barley.

gibberellins
A class of plant growth hormones (auxins) of which over 60 are known; these were first isolated in 1938 from cultures of Gibberella fujikuroi, the fungus causing Bakanese disease in rice. Also found in higher plants; diterpenoid acids available commercially.

gibbon (gib′on)
A genus of anthropoid apes, Hylobates, of the superfamily Hominoidea. [Fr.]

gibbous (gib′us)
Humped; humpbacked; denoting a sharp angle in the flexion of the spine. [L. gibbosus]

Gibbs
Josiah W., U.S. mathematician and physicist, 1839–1903. See G.-Donnan equilibrium, G.-Helmholtz equation, Helmholtz-G. theory, G. theorem, G. free energy, G. energy of activation.

gibbus (gib′us)
Extreme kyphosis, hump, or hunch; a deformity of spine in which there is a sharply angulated segment, the apex of the angle being posterior. [L. a hump]

Gibney
Virgil P., U.S. orthopedist, 1847–1927. See G. fixation bandage, G. boot.

Gibson
George A., Scottish physician, 1854–1913. See G. murmur.

Gibson
Kasson C., U.S. dentist, 1849–1925. See G. bandage.

Giemsa
Gustav, German bacteriologist, 1867–1948. See G. stain, G. chromosome banding stain.

Gierke
Edgar von, German pathologist, 1877–1945. See G. disease, von G. disease.

Gierke
Hans P.B., German anatomist, 1847–1886. See G. respiratory bundle.

Gifford
Harold, U.S. ophthalmologist, 1858–1929. See G. reflex.

GIFT
Abbreviation for gamete intrafallopian transfer.

giga- (G)
Prefix used in the SI and metric system to signify multiples of one billion (109). [G. gigas, giant]

gigantism (ji′gan-tizm)
A condition of abnormal size or overgrowth of the entire body or of any of its parts. SYN: giantism. [G. gigas, giant] acromegalic g. a form of pituitary g. in which the signs of acromegaly accompany abnormal height. cerebral g. a syndrome characterized by increased birth weight and length (above 90th percentile), accelerated growth rate for the first 4 or 5 years without elevation of serum growth hormone levels, and then reversion to normal growth rate; characteristic facies include prognathism, hypertelorism, antimongoloid slant, and dolichocephalic skull; moderate mental retardation and impaired coordination are also associated. See Sotos syndrome. eunuchoid g. g. with deficient development of sexual organs; may be of pituitary or gonadal origin; g. accompanied by body proportions typical of hypogonadism during adolescence. fetal g. excessive fetal or newborn size, e.g., cerebral g. and infants of diabetic mothers. pituitary g. a form of g. caused by hypersecretion of pituitary growth hormone; a rare disorder commonly the result of a pituitary adenoma. primordial g. unusually large size from birth due to familial or genetic factors or intrauterine environment ( e.g., maternal prediabetic state) and not to hyperpituitarism.

giganto-
Huge, gigantic. [G. gigas, one of the race of giants]

gigantomastia (ji-gan′to-mas′te-a)
Massive hypertrophy of the breast. [giganto- + G. mastos, breast]

Gigantorhynchus (ji-gan′to-ring′kus)
A genus of very large acanthocephalan worms. SEE ALSO: Macracanthorhynchus, Moniliformis. [giganto- + G. rhynchos, snout]

Gigli
Leonardo, Italian gynecologist, 1863–1908. See G. saw.

GIH
Abbreviation for growth hormone-inhibiting hormone.

Gila monster (he′la)
A large poisonous lizard, Heloderma suspectum of New Mexico, Arizona, and northern Mexico. [Gila, a river in Arizona]

Gilbert
Nicholas A., French physician, 1858–1927. See G. disease, G. syndrome.

Gilbert
Walter, U.S. microbiologist and Nobel laureate, *1932. See Maxim-G. sequencing.

gilbert
The unit of magnetomotive force or magnetic potential. [W. G., English physicist, 1544–1603]

Gilchrist
Thomas C., U.S. physician, 1862–1927. See G. disease.

Gilford
Hastings, English physician, 1861–1941. See Hutchinson-G. disease, Hutchinson-G. syndrome.

Gilles de la Tourette
Georges, French physician, 1857–1904. See G. disease, G. syndrome, Tourette disease, Tourette syndrome.

Gillespie
Frank, U.S. ophthalmologist, *1927. See G. syndrome.

Gillette
Eugène P., French surgeon, 1836–1886. See G. suspensory ligament.

Gilliam
David Tod, U.S. gynecologist, 1844–1923. See G. operation.

Gillies
Sir Harold D., British plastic surgeon, 1882–1960. See G. operation, Filatov-G. flap.

Gillmore needle
See under needle.

Gilman
Alfred G., *1941, co-winner of the 1994 Nobel Prize for work related to G proteins, q.v.

Gilmer
Thomas L., U.S. oral surgeon, 1849–1931. See G. wiring.

Gil-Vernet
Jose Maria Vila, Spanish urologist, *1922. See Gil-Vernet operation.

Gimbernat
Antonio de, Spanish anatomist and surgeon, 1734–1816. See G. ligament.

ginger (jin′jer)
The dried rhizome of Zingiber officinale (family Zingiberaceae), known in commerce as Jamaica g., African g., and Cochin g. The outer cortical layers are often either partially or completely removed; used as a carminative and flavoring agent. SYN: zingiber. Chinese g. SYN: galangal. Indian g. SYN: Asarum canadense. g. oleoresin a carminative, stimulant, and flavoring agent. wild g. SYN: Asarum canadense.

gingili oil (jin′ji-le)
SYN: sesame oil.

gingiva, gen. and pl. gingivae (jin′ji-va, -ve) [TA]
The dense fibrous tissue and overlying mucous membrane, which envelop the alveolar processes of the upper and lower jaws and surrounds the necks of the teeth. SYN: gum (2) &star. [L.] alveolar g. gingival tissue applied to the alveolar bone. attached g. that part of the oral mucosa which is firmly bound to the tooth and alveolar process. buccal g. that portion of the g. that covers the buccal surfaces of the teeth and alveolar process. free g. that portion of the g. that surrounds the tooth and is not directly attached to the tooth surface; the outer wall of the gingival sulcus. labial g. that portion of the g. that covers the labial surfaces of the teeth and the alveolar process. lingual g. that portion of the g. that covers the lingual surfaces of the teeth and the alveolar process. septal g. that portion of the g. that covers the interdental septum.




A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

. . . Feedback