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Medical Dictionary


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hodophobia (ho-do-fo′be-a)
Morbid fear of traveling. [G. hodos, path, + phobos, fear]

hoechst 33258
A bisbenzimidazole dye employed in cytochemistry and fluorescence microscopy as a sensitive indicator of DNA in chromosomes, specifically constitutive heterochromatin.

Hoeppli
Reinhard J.C., German parasitologist, 1893–1973. See Splendore-H. phenomenon.

hof (hof)
The hollow in the cytoplasm of a cell that lodges the nucleus. [Ger. court]

Hofbauer
J. Isfred I., U.S. gynecologist, 1878–1961. See H. cell.

Hoffa
Albert, German surgeon, 1859–1907. See H. operation.

Hoffman
August Wilhelm, German chemist, 1818–1892. See Frei-Hoffmann reaction, H. violet.

Hoffmann
Friedrich (Fredericus), German physician, 1660–1742. Professor of Anatomy and Surgery at Halle, noted for clinical observations of a variety of infectious diseases.

Hoffmann
Johann, German neurologist, 1857–1919. See H. muscular atrophy, H. phenomenon, H. reflex, H. sign, Werdnig-H. disease, Werdnig-H. muscular atrophy.

Hoffmann
Moritz, German anatomist, 1622–1698. See H. duct.

Hofmann, Hofmann-Wellenhof
Georg von, Austrian bacteriologist, 1843–1890. See H. bacillus.

Hofmeister
Franz von, German surgeon, 1867–1926. See H. operation, H.-Pólya anastomosis.

Hofmeister
Franz, German biochemist, 1850–1922. See H. series, H. gastrectomy.

Hogben
Lawrence, British mathematician, *1895. See H. number.

Hogness
D.S., U.S. molecular biologist, *1925. See Grunstein-H. assay, H. box.

holandric (hol-an′drik)
Related to genes located on the Y chromosome. [G. holos, entire, + aner, human male]

holarthritic (hol-ar-thrit′ik)
Relating to holarthritis.

holarthritis (hol-ar-thri′tis)
Inflammation of all or a great number of the joints. [G. holos, entire, + arthron, joint, + -itis, inflammation]

Holden
Luther, English anatomist, 1815–1905. See H. line.

Holder
See Virchow-H. angle.

hole in retina
A break in the continuity of the sensory retina, permitting separation between the retinal pigment epithelium and sensory retina.

holism (ho′lizm)
1. The principle that an organism, or one of its actions, is not equal to merely the sum of its parts but must be perceived or studied as a whole. 2. The approach to the study of a psychological phenomenon through the analysis of a phenomenon as a complete entity in itself. Cf.:atomism. [G. holos, entire]

holistic (ho-lis′tik)
Pertaining to the characteristics of holism or h. psychologies.

Holl
Mortiz, Austrian surgeon, 1852–1920. See H. ligament.

Hollander
Franklin, U.S. physiologist, 1899–1966. See H. test.

Hollenhorst
Robert W., U.S. ophthalmologist, *1913. See H. plaques, under plaque.

Holliday
R. See H. junction, H. structure.

hollow (hol′o)
A concavity or depression. Sebileau h. depression between the inferior aspect of the tongue and the sublingual glands.

Holmes
Sir Gordon M., English neurologist, 1876–1965. See H.-Adie pupil, H.-Adie syndrome, Stewart-H. sign.

Holmes
Oliver Wendell. American physician, 1809–1894, identified the mode of spread and control of puerperal fever,

Holmes
Thomas, U.S. psychiatrist, *1918. See H.-Rahe questionnaire.

Holmes
Walter Chapin, 1884–1932. See H. stain.

Holmgren
Alarik Frithiof, Swedish physiologist, 1831–1897. See H. wool test.

Holmgren
Emil A., Swedish histologist, 1866–1922. See Holmgrén-Golgi canals, under canal.

holmium (Ho) (hol′me-um)
An element of the lanthanide group, atomic no. 67, atomic wt. 164.93032. [L. Holmia, for Stockholm]

holo-
Whole, entire, complete. [G. holos]

holoacardius (hol′o-a-kar′de-us)
A separate, grossly defective twin lacking a heart of its own, its blood supply being dependent on a shunt from the placental circulation of a more nearly normal twin; a placental parasitic twin or omphalosite. Cf.:acardius. [holo- + G. a- priv. + kardia, heart] h. acephalus a h. also lacking a head. h. amorphus a h. in which the body of the parasite is represented by only a shapeless mass. SEE ALSO: anideus.

holo-ACP synthase
An enzyme catalyzing transfer of the 4′-phosphopantetheinyl residue from coenzyme A to a serine of apo-ACP (acyl carrier protein) to form holo-ACP, releasing adenosine 3′,5′-bisphosphate; a required step if fatty acid biosynthesis is to function.

holoacrania (hol′o-a-kra′ne-a)
A congenital skull defect in which bones of the vault are absent. [holo- + G. a- priv. + kranion, skull]

holoanencephaly (hol′o-an-en-sef′a-le)
Complete absence of cranium and brain. [holo- + G. an- priv. + enkephalos, brain]

holoblastic (hol-o-blas′tik)
Denoting the involvement of the entire (isolecithal or moderately telolecithal) ovum in cleavage. [holo- + G. blastos, germ]

holocarboxylase synthetase (hol-o-kar-boks′il-as sen′the-tas)
One of several enzymes that biotinylate other proteins ( e.g., carboxylases); a deficiency of h. will result in organic acidemia.

holocephalic (hol′o-se-fal′ik)
Denoting a fetus with a complete head but having deficiencies in other body parts. [holo- + G. kephale, head]

holocord (hol′o-kord)
Relating to the entire spinal cord, extending from the cervicomedullary junction to the conus medullaris.

holocrine (hol′o-krin)
See h. gland. [holo- + G. krino, to separate]

holodiastolic (hol′o-di-a-stol′ik)
Relating to or occupying the entire diastolic period.

holoendemic (hol′o-en-dem′ik)
Endemic in the entire population, as trachoma in the villages of Saudi Arabia.

holoenzyme (hol-o-en′zim)
A complete enzyme, i.e., apoenzyme plus coenzyme, cofactor, metal ion, and/or prosthetic group.

hologastroschisis (hol′o-gas-tros′ki-sis)
A congenital malformation in which a cleft extends the entire length of the abdomen. [holo- + G. gaster, belly, + schisis, cleaving]

hologram (hol′o-gram)
A three-dimensional image produced by wavefront reconstruction and recorded on a photographic plate. [holo- + G. gramma, something written]

holography (ho-log′ra-fe)
The process of creating a hologram.

hologynic (hol-o-jin′ik)
Related to characters manifest only in females. [holo- + G. gyne, woman]

holomastigote (hol-o-mas′ti-got)
Possessing flagella over the entire surface. [holo- + G. mastix, whip]

holometabolous (hol′o-me-tab′o-lus)
Pertaining to a member of the Holometabola, a series of insect orders in which complex or complete metamorphosis is found. [holo- + G. metabole, change]

holomiantic (infection) (hol′om-i-an-tik)
Infectious outbreak due to exposure of a group of persons to an agent that affects or is common to all members of the group. [holo + C. miantos, defiled, fr. miaino. to defile, + -ic]

holomorphosis (hol′o-mor-fo′sis)
Rarely used term for attainment or reestablishment of physical wholeness. [holo- + G. morphosis, shaping]

holophytic (hol-o-fit′ik)
Having a plantlike mode of obtaining nourishment; denoting certain photosynthesizing protozoans, e.g., Euglena. [holo- + G. phyton, plant]

holoprosencephaly (hol′o-pros-en-sef′a-le)
Presence of a single forebrain hemisphere or lobe; cycloplia occurs in the severest form. It is often accompanied by a deficit in median facial development. [holo- + G. proso, forward, + enkephalos, brain]

holoprotein (ho-lo-pro-ten)
A complete protein; I.E., apoprotein plus metal ion and/or prosthetic group.

holorachischisis (hol′o-ra-kis′ki-sis)
Spina bifida of the entire spinal column. SYN: araphia, rachischisis totalis. [holo- + G. rhachis, spine, + schisis, fissure]

holoside (hol′o-sid)
A compound containing one or more identical, glycosidically linked carbohydrates.

holosystolic (hol′o-sis-tol′ik)
SYN: pansystolic.

holotelencephaly (hol′o-tel-en-sef′a-le)
Holoprosencephaly associated with arrhinencephaly. [holo- + telencephalon]

holothurins (hol-o-thu′rins)
A class of highly toxic sulfated steroid glycosides secreted by sea cucumbers (Holothurioidea).

holotrichous (ho-lot′ri-kus)
Possessing cilia over the entire surface. [holo- + G. thrix, hair]

holozoic (hol-o-zo′ik)
Animal-like in mode of obtaining nourishment, lacking photosynthetic capacity; denoting certain protozoans, in distinction to others that are holophytic. [holo- + G. zoon, animal]

Holt
Mary, 20th century English cardiologist. See H.-Oram syndrome.

Holter
Norman, U.S. biophysicist, 1914–1983. See H. monitor.

Holthouse
Carsten, British surgeon, 1810–1901. See H. hernia.

Holzknecht
Guido, Austrian radiologist, 1872–1931. See H. unit.

homalocephalous (hom′a-lo-sef′a-lus)
Having a flattened head. [G. homalos, level, + kephale, head]

Homalomyia (hom′a-lo-mi′ya)
A genus of flies the larvae of which sometimes infect human or animal intestines. [G. homalos, even, + myia, a fly]

homaluria (hom-a-loo′re-a)
Rarely used term for normal urine flow. [G. homalos, level, + ouron, urine]

Homans
John, U.S. surgeon, 1877–1954. See H. sign.

homatropine (ho-mat′ro-pen)
An anticholinergic, mydriatic, and cycloplegic agent; available as the hydrobromide and the methylbromide. SYN: mandelytropine, tropine mandelate.




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