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Medical Dictionary


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kringle (krin′gle)
A structural motif or domain seen in certain proteins in which a fold of large loops is stabilized by disulfide bonds; an important structural feature in blood coagulation factors. [Ger. Kringel, curl]

Krogh
August, Danish physiologist and Nobel laureate, 1874–1949. See K. spirometer.

Kronecker
Karl H., Swiss physiologist, 1839–1914. See K. stain.

Krönig
Georg, German physician, 1856–1911. See K. isthmus, K. steps, under step.

Krönlein
Rudolf U., Swiss surgeon, 1847–1910. See K. operation, K. hernia.

Krueger instrument stop
See under instrument.

Krukenberg
Adolph, German anatomist, 1816–1877. See K. veins, under vein.

Krukenberg
Friedrich, German pathologist, 1871–1946. See K. amputation, K. spindle, K. tumor.

Kruse
Walther, German bacteriologist, 1864–1943. See K. brush, Shiga-K. bacillus.

krymo-, kryo-
See crymo-, cryo-.

krypton (Kr) (krip′ton)
One of the noble gases, present in small amounts in the atmosphere (1.14 ppm by dry volume); atomic no. 36, atomic wt. 83.80; 85Kr (half-life of 10.73 years) has been used in studies of cardiac abnormalities. [G. kryptos, concealed]

17-KS
Abbreviation for 17-ketosteroids.

KUB
Abbreviation for kidneys, ureters, bladder; archaic term for a plain frontal supine radiograph of the abdomen.

kubisagari, kubisagaru (koo-bi-sah-gah′re, koo-bi-sah-gah′roo)
SYN: vestibular neuronitis. [Jap. kubi, head, neck, + sagaru, to hang down]

Kufs
Hugo, German psychiatrist, 1871–1955. See K. disease.

Kugel anastomotic artery
See under artery.

Kugelberg
Eric, Swedish neurologist, 1913–1983. See K.-Welander disease, Wohlfart-K.-Welander disease.

Kühne
Wilhelm (Willy) F., German physiologist and histologist, 1837–1900. See K. fiber, K. methylene blue, K. phenomenon, K. plate, K. spindle.

Kuhnt
Hermann, German ophthalmologist, 1850–1925. See K. spaces, under space.

Kulchitsky
Nicholas, Russian histologist, 1856–1925. See K. cells, under cell.

Külz
Rudolph E., German physician, 1845–1895. See K. cylinder.

Küntscher
Gerhard, German surgeon, 1902–1972. See K. nail.

Kupffer
Karl W. von, German anatomist, 1829–1902. See K. cells, under cell.

kurchi bark (ker′che)
SYN: conessi.

Kürsteiner, Kuersteiner
W., 19th century German anatomist. See K. canals, under canal.

kurtosis (kur-to′sis)
The extent to which a unimodal distribution is peaked. [G., an arching]

kuru (koo′roo)
A progressive, fatal form of spongiform encephalopathy endemic to Fore people in the highlands of New Guinea, initially attributed to a “slow virus” infection, but now known to be caused by prions. Transmission is believed to be effected by contamination and ingestion during ritual cannabalism. It is characterized by ataxia, tremors, lack of coordination and death; pathological lesions in the brain include neuronal loss, ostrocytosis and status spongiosus. See prion. [native dialect, to shiver from fear or cold]

Kurzrok-Ratner test
See under test.

Kussmaul
Adolph, German physician, 1822–1902. See K. respiration, K. coma, K. disease, K. sign, K.-Kien respiration.

Küster
Herman, early 20th century German gynecologist. See Mayer-Rokitansky-K.-Hauser syndrome, Rokitansky-K.-Hauser syndrome.

Küstner
Heinz, German gynecologist, *1897. See Prausnitz-K. antibody, Prausnitz-K. reaction, reversed Prausnitz-K. reaction.

kv
Abbreviation for kilovolt.

Kveim
Morton A., Norwegian physician, *1892. See K. antigen, K. test, K.-Siltzbach antigen, K.-Siltzbach test, Nickerson-K. test.

kVp
Abbreviation for kilovolts peak, the highest instantaneous voltage across an x-ray tube, corresponding to the highest energy x-rays emitted.

kwashiorkor (kwah-she-or′kor)
A disease seen originally in Africans, particularly children 1–3 years old, due to dietary deficiency, particularly of protein; characterized by marked hypoalbuminemia, anemia, edema, pot belly, depigmentation of the skin, loss of hair or change in hair color to red, and bulky stools containing undigested food; fatty changes in the cells of the liver, atrophy of the acinar cells of the pancreas, and hyalinization of the renal glomeruli are found postmortem. SYN: infantile pellagra, malignant malnutrition. [Ga, a language of Ghana, red boy or displaced child] marasmic k. severe protein-calorie malnutrition characterized by extreme weight loss, weakness, and features of k..

ky-
For words beginning thus and not found below, see cy-.

kymogram (ki′mo-gram)
The graphic curve made by a kymograph.

kymograph (ki′mo-graf)
An obsolete instrument for recording wavelike motions or modulation, especially for recording variations in blood pressure; it consists of a drum usually revolved by clockwork and covered with smoked paper upon which the curve is inscribed by a stylet or other writing point. [G. kyma, wave, + grapho, to record]

kymography (ki-mog′ra-fe)
Use of the kymograph.

kymoscope (ki′mo-skop)
An apparatus once used for measuring the pulse waves, or the variation in blood pressure. [G. kyma, wave, + skopeo, to regard]

kynurenic acid (kin-u-re′nik, -ren′ik)
A product of the metabolism of l-tryptophan; appears in human urine in states of marked pyridoxine deficiency.

kynureninase (ki-noo-ren′i-nas)
A liver enzyme catalyzing the hydrolysis of the l-kynurenine side chain, with the formation of anthranilic acid and l-alanine, in l-tryptophan metabolism.

kynurenine (ki-noo′re-nen, -nin)
A product of the metabolism of l-tryptophan, excreted in the urine in small amounts; elevated in cases of vitamin B6 deficiency. k. formamidase SYN: formamidase. k. 3-hydroxylase SYN: k. 3-monooxygenase. k. 3-monooxygenase an enzyme catalyzing addition of a hydroxyl group to l-k., with the aid of NADPH and O2, producing 3-hydroxy-l-k., NADP+, and water; a step in the catabolism of l-tryptophan. SYN: k. 3-hydroxylase.

kyphos (ki′fos)
A hump, the convex prominence in kyphosis. [G.]

kyphoscoliosis (ki-fo-sko′le-o-sis)
Lateral and posterior curvature of the spine; severe congestive heart failure can be a late complication. SYN: scoliokyphosis. [G. kyphosis, kyphosis, + scoliosis, curved]

kyphosis (ki-fo′sis)
1. An anteriorly concave curvature of the vertebral column; the normal kyphoses of the thoracic and sacral regions are retained portions of the primary curvature (k.) of the vertebral column. 2. A forward (flexion) curvature of the spine; the thoracic spine normally has a mild k.; excessive forward curvature of the thoracic spine may represent a pathologic condition. [G. k., hump-back, fr. kyphos, bent, hump-backed] juvenile k. SYN: Scheuermann disease. sacral k. [TA] the normal, anteriorly concave curvature of the sacrum (sacral segment of the vertebral column), in which the primary curvature of the fetal embryo is maintained into maturity. SYN: k. sacralis TA] [TA] . k. sacralis TA] [TA] SYN: sacral k.. thoracic k. [TA] the normal, anteriorly concave curvature of the thoracic segment of the vertebral column, in which the primary curvature of the fetal embryo is maintained into maturity. SYN: k. thoracica [TA] . k. thoracica [TA] SYN: thoracic k..

kyphotic (ki-fot′ik)
Relating to or suffering from kyphosis.

Kyrle
Josef, German dermatologist, 1880–1926. See K. disease.

kyto-
See cyto-.




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