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Medical Dictionary


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lipotropic (lip-o-trop′ik)
1. Pertaining to substances preventing or correcting excessive fat deposits in liver such as occurs in choline deficiency. 2. Relating to lipotropy.

lipotropin (li-po-tro′pin)
A pituitary hormone mobilizing fat from adipose tissue. β-L. is a single-chain peptide of 91 amino acyl residues that contains the sequences of endorphins, metenkephalin, and β-melanotropin; γ-l. is shorter and is identical in sequence to the N-terminal 58 residues of β-l.; both contain sequences common to ACTH and β-melanotropin. SYN: lipid-mobilizing hormone, lipotropic hormone, lipotropic pituitary hormone.

lipotropy (li-pot′ro-pe)
1. Affinity of basic dyes for fatty tissue. 2. Prevention of accumulation of fat in the liver. 3. Affinity of nonpolar substances for each other. [lipo- + G. trope, turning]

lipovaccine (lip′o-vak-sen)
A vaccine suspended in vegetable oil as a solvent. See adjuvant vaccine.

lipovitellin (lip′o-vi-tel′in)
SYN: vitellin.

lipoxenous (li-pok′se-nus)
Pertaining to lipoxeny.

lipoxeny (li-pok′se-ne, li-)
Desertion of the host by a parasite when the development of the latter is complete. [G. leipo, to leave, + xenos, host]

lipoxidase (li-poks′i-das)
SYN: lipoxygenase.

lipoxygenase (li-poks′e-je-nas)
A class of enzymes that catalyzes the oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids with O2 to yield hydroperoxides of the fatty acids; 5-l. catalyzes the first step in leukotriene biosynthesis, acting on arachidonate. SYN: carotene oxidase, lipoxidase.

lipoyl (lip′o-il)
The acyl radical of lipoic acid.

lipoyl dehydrogenase
SYN: dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase.

lipping (lip′ing)
The formation of a liplike structure, as at the articular end of a bone in osteoarthritis.

lippitude, lippitudo (lip′i-tood, lip-i-too′do)
SYN: blear eye. [L., fr. lippus, blear-eyed]

Lipschütz
Benjamin, Austrian physician, 1878–1931. See L. cell.

lipuria (li-poo′re-a)
Presence of lipids in the urine. SYN: adiposuria. [lipo- + G. ouron, urine]

lipuric (li-poo′rik)
Pertaining to lipuria.

liquefacient (lik′we-fa′shent)
1. Making liquid; causing a solid to become liquid. 2. Denoting a resolvant supposed to cause the resolution of a solid tumor by liquefying its contents. [L. lique-facio, pres. p. -faciens, to make fluid, fr. liqueo, to be liquid]

liquefaction (lik-we-fak′shun)
The act of becoming liquid; change from a solid to a liquid form. [see liquefacient]

liquefactive (lik-we-fak′tiv)
Relating to liquefaction.

liqueur (li-ker′)
A cordial; a spirit containing sugar and aromatics. [Fr.]

liquid (l) (lik′wid)
1. An inelastic substance, like water, that is neither solid nor gaseous and in which the molecules are relatively free to move with respect to each other yet still are restricted by intermolecular forces. 2. Flowing like water. [L. liquidus] Cotunnius l. SYN: perilymph.

liquor, gen. liquoris, pl .liquores (lik′er, -wor-is, -wo′res) [TA]
1. Any liquid or fluid. 2. A term used for certain body fluids. 3. The pharmacopoeial term for any aqueous solution (not a decoction or infusion) of a nonvolatile substance and for aqueous solutions of gases. SEE ALSO: solution. [L.] l. amnii SYN: amnionic fluid. l. cerebrospinalis [TA] SYN: cerebrospinal fluid. l. cotunnii SYN: perilymph. l. entericus intestinal secretions. l. folliculi the fluid within the antrum of the ovarian follicle. malt l. a beverage brewed from malt, such as beer or ale. Morgagni l. a fluid found postmortem between the epithelium and the fibers of the lens, resulting from the liquefaction of a semifluid material existing there during life. SYN: Morgagni humor. mother l. the saturated solution remaining after a crystallization or precipitation. Scarpa l. SYN: endolymph. spirituous l. a strong alcoholic l. obtained by distillation, such as whiskey. vinous l. SYN: wine (1) .

liquorice (lik′o-ris)
SYN: glycyrrhiza.

liquorrhea (lik-o-re′a)
The flow of liquid. [L. liquor, fluid, + G. rhoia, flow]

Lisch
Karl, Austrian ophthalmologist, *1907. See L. nodule.

Lisfranc (de St. Martin)
Jacques, French surgeon, 1790–1847. See L. amputation, L. joints, under joint, L. ligaments, under ligament, L. operation, scalene tubercle of L..

lisinopril (lis-in′o-pril)
An angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor used in the treatment of hypertension.

Lison
Lucien, Belgian scientist, *1907. See L.-Dunn stain.

lisping
Mispronunciation of the sibilants s and z. SYN: parasigmatism, sigmatism.

lissamine rhodamine B 200 (lis′sa-men ro′da-men)
SYN: sulforhodamine B.

Lissauer
Heinrich, German neurologist, 1861–1891. See L. bundle, L. column, L. fasciculus, L. tract, L. marginal zone, column of Spitzka-L..

lissencephalia (lis′en-se-fa′le-a)
SYN: agyria. [G. lissos, smooth, + enkephalos, brain]

lissencephalic (lis′en-se-fal′ik)
Pertaining to, or characterized by, lissencephalia.

lissencephaly (lis-en-sef′a-le)
SYN: agyria. [G. lissos, smooth, + enkephalos, brain]

lissive (lis′iv)
Having the property of relieving muscle spasm without causing flaccidity. [G. lissos, smooth]

lissosphincter (lis′o-sfingk′ter)
A sphincter of smooth musculature. SYN: smooth muscular sphincter. [G. lissos, smooth, + sphincter]

lissotrichic, lissotrichous (lis-o-trik′ik, -trik′us)
Having straight hair. [G. lissos, smooth, + thrix (trich-), hair]

Lister
Joseph (Lord L.), English surgeon, 1827–1912. See Listerella, Listeria, listerism, L. dressing, L. method, L. tubercle.

Listerella (lis′ter-el′a)
In bacteriology, a rejected generic name sometimes cited as a synonym of Listeria. The type species is L. hepatolytica. [Joseph Lister]

Listeria (lis-ter-e-a)
A genus of aerobic to microaerophilic, motile, peritrichous bacteria containing small, coccoid, Gram-positive rods; these organisms tend to produce chains of 3–5 cells and, in the rough state, elongated and filamentous forms. Cells 18–24 hours old may show a palisade arrangement with a few V or Y forms; the bacteria produce acid but no gas from glucose and are found in the feces of humans and other animals, on vegetation, and in silage and are parasitic on poikilothermic and warm-blooded animals, including humans. The type species is L. monocytogenes. [Joseph Lister] L. denitrificans a bacterial species reclassified as Jonesia denitrificans. L. grayi a bacterial species found in the feces of chinchillas. L. monocytogenes a bacterial species causing meningitis, encephalitis, septicemia, endocarditis, abortion, abscesses, and local purulent lesions; it is often fatal; it is found in healthy ferrets, insects, and the feces of chinchillas, ruminants, and humans, as well as in sewage, decaying vegetation, silage, soil, and fertilizer. Sometimes involved in infections in immunocompromised hosts. A causative agent of perinatal infections, neonatal sepsis and septicemia. Also recently linked to food-borne diseases especially associated with meat and dairy products.

listeriosis (lis-ter′e-o′sis)
A sporadic disease of animals and humans, particularly those who are immunocompromised or pregnant, caused by the bacterium, Listeria monocytogenes. The infection in sheep and cattle frequently involves the central nervous system, causing various neurologic signs; in monogastric animals and fowl, the chief manifestations are septicemia and necrosis of the liver. Meningitis, bacteremia, and focal metastatic disease are associated with l.. SYN: listeria meningitis. [fr. organism Listeria]

listerism (lis′ter-izm)
SYN: Lister method.

Listing
Johann B., German physiologist, 1808–1882. See L. reduced eye, L. law.

Liston
Robert, English surgeon, 1794–1847. See L. knives, under knife, L. shears.

lisuride (li′soor-id)
A soluble ergot derivative with endocrine effects similar to those of bromocriptine; a serotonin inhibitor.

liter (L, l) (le′ter)
A measure of capacity of 1000 cubic centimeters or 1 cubic decimeter; equivalent to 1.056688 quarts (U.S., liquid). [Fr., fr. G. litra, a pound]

literature


lith-
See litho-.

lithagogue (lith′a-gog)
Causing the dislodgment or expulsion of calculi, especially urinary calculi. [litho- + G. agogos, drawing forth]

litharge (lith′arj)
SYN: lead monoxide. [litho- + G. argyros, silver]

lithectomy (li-thek′to-me)
SYN: lithotomy. [litho- + G. ektome, excision]

lithiasis (li-thi′a-sis)
Formation of calculi of any kind, especially of biliary or urinary calculi. [litho- + G. -iasis, condition] l. conjunctivae hard nodules caused by deposition of calcareous material in areas of cellular degeneration in Henle glands. 2,8-dihydroxyadenine l. formation of calculi of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine due to a deficiency or reduced activity of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase. pancreatic l. the formation of stones in the pancreas, usually associated with chronic inflammation and obstruction of the pancreatic ducts.

lithic acid (lith′ik)
SYN: uric acid.

lithium (Li) (lith′e-um)
An element of the alkali metal group, atomic no. 3, atomic wt. 6.941. Many of its salts have clinical applications. [Mod. L. fr. G. lithos, a stone] l. bromide LiBr;a white deliquescent powder, used as a sedative and hypnotic. l. carbonate an antirheumatic and antilithic agent, also used in the treatment and prophylaxis of depressive, hypomanic, and manic phases of bipolar affective disorders. l. citrate a diuretic and antirheumatic, also used in the treatment of manic psychosis. effervescent l. citrate a preparation containing l. citrate, sodium bicarbonate, tartaric acid, and citric acid; same use as potassium or sodium citrate. l. tungstate used in electron microscopy as a negative stain.

litho-, lith-
A stone, calculus, calcification. [G. lithos]

Lithobius (li-tho′be-us)
A genus of centipedes characterized by 15 pairs of legs. Species common in the U.S. include L. multidentatus and L. forficatus. [litho- + G. bios, life]

lithocholic acid (lith-o-ko′lik)
One of the acids isolated from human bile as well as from that of cows, rabbits, sheep, and goats.

lithoclast (lith′o-klast)
SYN: lithotrite. [litho- + G. klastos, broken]

lithogenesis, lithogeny (lith-o-jen′e-sis, lith-oj′e-ne)
Formation of calculi. [litho- + G. genesis, production]

lithogenic (lith-o-jen′ik)
Promoting the formation of calculi.

lithogenous (lith-oj′e-nus)
Calculus-forming.

lithoid (lith′oyd)
Resembling a calculus or stone. [litho- + G. eidos, resemblance]

lithokelyphopedion, lithokelyphopedium (lith-o-kel′e-fo-pe′de-on, -um)
A lithopedion in which the fetal parts in contact with the surrounding membranes, as well as the membranes, are calcified. [litho- + G. kelyphos, husk, shell, + paidion, child]

lithokelyphos (lith-o-kel′e-fos)
A type of lithopedion in which the fetal membranes alone undergo calcification. [litho- + G. kelyphos, rind, shell]

litholabe (lith′o-lab)
Obsolete instrument for holding a bladder calculus during its removal. [litho- + G. lambano, labein, to grasp]

litholapaxy (li-thol′a-pak-se)
The technique of crushing a stone in the bladder and washing out the fragments through a catheter. [litho- + G. lapaxis, an emptying out]

litholysis (li-thol′i-sis)
The dissolution of urinary calculi. [litho- + G. lysis, dissolution]

litholyte (lith′o-lit)
An instrument for injecting calculary solvents.

litholytic (li-tho-lit′ik)
1. Tending to dissolve calculi. 2. An agent having such properties. [litho- + G. lysis, dissolution]




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