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Medical Dictionary


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μ, upper case M
Mu, the 12th letter of the Greek alphabet:
  • Symbol for micro-
  • micron
  • dynamic viscosity
  • magnetic or electric dipole moment of a molecule
  • chemical potential
  • position of a substituent located on the 12th atom from the carboxyl or other functional group.
μB
Bohr magneton.

μN
Nuclear magneton.

μμ
micromicro-; micromicron.

μμg
Micromicrogram.

μΩ
Microhm.

μC
Microcoulomb.

μCi
Microcurie.

μg
Microgram.

μl, μL
Microliter.

μm
Micrometer.

μmol
Micromole.

μmol/L
Micromolar.

μV
Microvolt.

m
  • Mach
  • magnetic dipole moment
  • male
  • married
  • masculine
  • mass
  • Meter
  • milli-
  • minim
  • [Latin mille] thousand
  • million
  • minim
  • minute
  • molal
  • molality
  • molar
  • molarity
  • moles per liter (also written M)
  • mucoid
  • muscle

Symbol for millimicron.

m-
Abbreviation for meta-.

M
  • mega-
  • mitosis
  • morgan
  • molarity (moles per liter, also written M or m)
  • myopia or myopic
  • methionine
  • 6-mercaptopurine ribonucleoside in a nucleic acid
  • L. misce, mix
  • metal
  • blood factor. See entries under MNSs blood group, Blood Groups Appendix.
M.
Abbreviation for L. misce, mix.

Mr
Symbol for molecular weight ratio or relative molecular mass.

m-chloral
A polymer of chloral obtained by prolonged contact with sulfuric acid; it has properties similar to those of chloral hydrate. SYN: metachloral, p-chloral, trichloral.

m-cresol
A local antiseptic with a higher germicidal power than phenol and less toxicity to tissues; used in disinfectants and fumigants; its acetate derivative is used as a topical antiseptic and fungicide. SYN: metacresol.

meso-cystine
An isomer of cystine in which the configuration about one of the α-carbons is d, about the other, l, so that the molecule as a whole possesses a plane of symmetry and is optically inactive. Note that meso-cystine is not dl-cystine. dl-cystine is a racemic mixture of dd-cystine and ll-cystine.

113mIn
Abbreviation for indium-113m.

meso-inositol
1. Generic term for any isomer of m.inositol in which the hydroxyl groups are so arranged that the molecule as a whole possesses a plane of symmetry and is optically inactive. 2. Former name for myo-inositol.

myo-inositol
1,2,3,5/4,6-Inositol;a constituent of various phosphatidylinositols and the most widely distributed form of inositol found in microorganisms, higher plants, and animals. In plants, it is found as phytic acid and as phytin; partially phosphorylated and free forms occur throughout nature and in many tissues.

MA
Abbreviation for mental age; mentoanterior position.

ma, mA
Abbreviation for milliampere.

MAA
Abbreviation for macroaggregated albumin.

MAB
Abbreviation for monoclonal antibody.

MAC
1. Abbreviation for minimal anesthetic concentration; minimal alveolar concentration; membrane attack complex. 2. Abbreviation for Mycobacterium avium complex. See Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex.

Mac-
For proper names beginning thus, see also Mc-.

Macaca (ma-kah′ka)
A large genus of Old World monkeys (family Cercopithecidae) that includes the macaque and rhesus monkeys, and the Barbary apes. M. mulatta, the rhesus monkey, is used as a research animal. [Pg. macaco, monkey]

macaque (ma-kahk′)
See Macaca. [Fr.]

MacConkey
Alfred T., British bacteriologist, 1861–1931. See M. agar.

Mace, MACE
Acronym for methylchloroform 2-chloracetophenone (the classical lacrimator) in a light petroleum dispersant and a pressurized propellant.

macerate (mas′er-at)
To soften by steeping or soaking. [see maceration]

maceration (mas-er-a′shun)
1. Softening by the action of a liquid. 2. Softening of tissues after death by nonputrefactive (sterile) autolysis; seen especially in the stillborn, with detachment of the epidermis. [L. macero, pp. -atus, to soften by soaking]

Macewen
Sir William, Scottish surgeon, 1848–1924. See M. sign, M. symptom, M. triangle.

Mach
Ernst, Austrian scientist, 1838–1916. See M. band, M. number.

machine (ma-shen′)
Any mechanical apparatus or device. [L. machina, contrivance] anesthesia m. equipment used for inhalation anesthesia, including flowmeters, vaporizers, and sources of compressed gases, but not including the anesthetic circuit or mechanisms for elimination of carbon dioxide. heart-lung m. a device incorporating a blood pump (artificial heart) and a blood oxygenator (artificial lung) to provide extracorporeal circulation and oxygenation of the blood during cardiac surgery. panoramic rotating m. an x-ray m. using a reciprocating motion of the tube and extraoral film to produce a radiograph of all the teeth and surrounding structures. SEE ALSO: tomography.

Mackay
Ralph Stuart, U.S. physicist, *1924. See M.-Marg tonometer.

Mackenrodt
Alwin K., German gynecologist, 1859–1925. See M. ligament.

Mackenzie
Sir James, Scottish physician practicing in London, 1853–1925. See M. polygraph.

Mackenzie
Richard J., Scottish surgeon, 1821–1854. See M. amputation.

MacLachlan
Elsie A., 20th century researcher. See Lowe-Terrey-M. syndrome.

Macleod
Roderick, Scottish physician, 1795–1852. See M. rheumatism.

Macleod
William Mathieson, British physician, 1911–1977. See M. syndrome, Swyer-James-MacLeod syndrome.

maclurin (ma-kloor′in) [C.I. 75240]
A natural dye associated with morin and derived from fustic; used to dye fabrics with various metal mordants. It turns deep green on addition of ferric chloride.

MacNeal
Ward J., U.S. bacteriologist, 1881–1946. See M. tetrachrome blood stain, Novy and M. blood agar.

macr-
See macro-.

Macracanthorhynchus (mak′ra-kan-tho-ring′kus)
A genus of giant thorny-headed worms (class Acanthocephala). [macro- + G. akantha, thorn, + rhynchos, snout] M. hirudinaceus the giant thorny-headed worm of the pig, approximately the size of the giant roundworm (Ascaris); it inhabits the intestinal tract where nodules develop at the site of penetration of the spiny proboscis of each worm; it has occasionally been reported in man; transmission is by ingestion of infected insects, frequently dung beetles or cockroaches that have fed on feces of infected pigs containing viable eggs and have developed the cystacanth stage infective to the vertebrate host, including humans.

macrencephaly, macrencephalia (mak′ren-sef′a-le, -se-fa′le-a)
Hypertrophy of the brain; the condition of having a large brain. [macro- + G. enkephalos, brain]

macro-, macr-
Large, long. SEE ALSO: mega-, megalo-. [G. makros]

macroadenoma (mak′ro-ad-e-no′ma)
A pituitary adenoma larger than 10 mm in diameter.

macroamylase (mak-ro-am′i-las)
Descriptive term applied to a form of serum amylase in which the enzyme is present as a complex joined to a globulin; the molecular weight of the enzyme alone is 50,000, whereas that of the complex probably exceeds 160,000; hence, renal excretion of the complex is not appreciable.

macroamylasemia (mak′ro-am′i-la-se′me-a)
A form of hyperamylasemia, in which a portion of serum amylase exists as macroamylase. [macroamylase + G. haima, blood]

macrobacterium (mak′ro-bak-ter′e-um)
SYN: megabacterium.

macrobiosis (mak′ro-bi-o′sis)
SYN: longevity. [macro- + G. bios, life]

macrobiote (mak-ro-bi′ot)
An organism that is long-lived. [macro- + G. bios, life]

macrobiotic (mak′ro-bi-ot′ik)
1. Long lived. 2. Tending to prolong life.

macrobiotics (mak′ro-bi-ot′iks)
The study of the prolongation of life.

macroblast (mak′ro-blast)
A large erythroblast. [macro- + G. blastos, germ]

macroblepharon (mak′ro-blef′ar-on)
An abnormally large eyelid. [macro- + G. blepharon, eyelid]

macrobrachia (mak-ro-bra′ke-a)
Condition of having abnormally thick or long arms. [macro- + G. brachion, arm]

macrocardia (mak-ro-kar′de-a)
SYN: cardiomegaly.

macrocephalic, macrocephalous (mak′ro-se-fal′ik, -sef′a-lus)
SYN: megacephalic. [macro- + G. kephale, head]

macrocephaly, macrocephalia (mak-ro-sef′a-le, -se-fa′le-a)
SYN: megacephaly. [macro- + G. kephale, head]

macrocheilia, macrochilia (mak-ro-ki′le-a)
1. Abnormally enlarged lips. SYN: macrolabia. 2. Cavernous lymphangioma of the lip, a condition of permanent swelling of the lip resulting from the presence of greatly distended lymphatic spaces. [macro- + G. cheilos, lip]

macrocheiria, macrochiria (mak-ro-ki′re-a)
A condition characterized by abnormally large hands. SYN: cheiromegaly, chiromegaly, megalocheiria, megalochiria. [macro- + G. cheir, hand]

macrochemistry (mak-ro-kem′is-tre)
The use of chemical procedures, the reactions of which (color change, effervescence, etc.) are visible to the unaided eye. Cf.:microchemistry.




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