|| ANATOMY || DISEASES || DRUGS || HEALTH TOPICS || USA HEALTH STATS || CHINA HEALTH STATS || GENOMICS || LABORATORY MICE || LUPUS ||
Medical Dictionary banner
Medical Dictionary - Dictionary of Medicine and Human Biology


Medical Dictionary


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


monopodia (mon-o-po′de-a)
Malformation in which only one foot is externally recognizable. [mono- + G. pous, foot]

monops (mon′ops)
SYN: cyclops. [mono- + G. ops, eye]

monoptychial (mon-o-ti′ke-al)
Arranged in a single but folded layer, as the cells in the epithelium of the gallbladder or certain glands. [mono- + G. ptyche, fold]

monorchia (mon-or′ke-a)
SYN: monorchism.

monorchidic, monorchid (mon-or-kid′ik, mon-or′kid)
1. Having only one testis. 2. Having apparently only one testis, the other being undescended.

monorchidism (mon-or′ki-dizm)
SYN: monorchism.

monorchism (mon′or-kizm)
A condition in which only one testis is apparent, the other being absent or undescended. SYN: monorchia, monorchidism. [mono- + G. orchis, testis]

monorecidive (mon-o-res′i-dev)
Denoting a late or tertiary manifestation of syphilis which takes the form of an ulcerated papule located at the site of the original chancre. [mono- + L. recidivus, relapsing]

monorhinic (mon-o-rin′ik)
Single-nosed; used to characterize conjoined twins in which only a single nose cavity is evident. [mono- + G. rhis (rhin-), nose]

monosaccharide (mon-o-sak′a-rid)
A carbohydrate that cannot form any simpler sugar by simple hydrolysis; e.g., pentoses, hexoses. SYN: monose.

monoscelous (mon-o-sel′us, -skel′us)
Having only one leg. [mono- + G. skelos, leg]

monoscenism (mon-o-se′nizm)
Morbid concentration on some past experience. [mono- + G. skene, tent (stage drop)]

monose (mon′os)
SYN: monosaccharide.

monosodium glutamate (MSG) (mon-o-so′de-um gloo′ta-mat)
The monosodium salt of the naturally occurring l form of glutamic acid; used as a flavor enhancer that is a cause or contributing factor to “Chinese restaurant” syndrome; also used intravenously as an adjunct in treatment of encephalopathies associated with hepatic disease.

monosome (mon′o-som)
1. SYN: accessory chromosome. 2. Obsolete term for ribosome. 3. A structure consisting of a single ribosome bound to a molecule of mRNA. [mono- + chromosome]

monosomia (mon-o-so′me-a)
In conjoined twins, a condition in which there are two heads and a single trunk. See conjoined twins, under twin. [mono- + G. soma, body]

monosomic (mon-o-so′mik)
Relating to monosomy.

monosomous (mon-o-so′mus)
Characterized by or pertaining to monosomia.

monosomy (mon′o-so-me)
Absence of one chromosome of a pair of homologous chromosomes. SEE ALSO: chromosomal deletion. [see monosome]

monospermy (mon′o-sper-me)
Fertilization by the entrance of only one spermatozoon into the egg. [mono- + G. sperma, seed]

Monosporium apiospermum (mon-o-spo′re-um ap′e-o-sper′mum)
Former name for Scedosporium apiospermum. Telemorph is Pseudallescheria boydii.

Monostoma (mo-nos′to-ma, mon-o-sto′ma)
Archaic name for a genus of trematodes, based on the presence of a single sucker. [mono- + G. stoma, mouth]

monostome (mon′o-stom)
Common name for digenetic trematodes that possess a single sucker, oral or ventral, rather than both. SEE ALSO: Monostoma. [mono- + G. stoma, mouth]

monostotic (mon-os-tot′ik)
Involving only one bone. [mono- + G. osteon, bone]

monostratal (mon-o-stra′tal)
Composed of a single layer. [mono- + L. stratum, layer]

monosubstituted (mon-o-sub′sti-too-ted)
In chemistry, denoting an element or radical, only one atom or unit of which is found in each molecule of a substitution compound.

monosymptomatic (mon′o-simp-to-mat′ik)
Denoting a disease or morbid condition manifested by only one marked symptom.

monosynaptic (mon′o-si-nap′tik)
Referring to direct neural connections (those not involving an internuncial neuron); e.g., the direct connection between primary sensory nerve cells and motor neurons characterizing the m. reflex arc.

monosyphilide (mon-o-sif′i-lid)
Marked by the occurrence of a single syphilitic lesion.

monoterpenes (mon-o-ter′penz)
Hydrocarbons or their derivatives formed by the condensation of two isoprene units, and therefore containing 10 carbon atoms; e.g., camphor; often containing a cyclic structure.

monothermia (mon-o-ther′me-a)
Evenness of bodily temperature; absence of an evening rise in body temperature. [mono- + G. therme, heat]

monothioglycerol (mon′o-thi-o-glis′er-ol)
Used to promote wound healing. SYN: thioglycerol.

monotocous (mo-not′o-kus)
Producing a single offspring at a birth. [mono- + G. tokos, birth]

Monotremata (mon-o-tre′ma-ta)
An order of egg-laying mammals that have a cloaca or common chamber that receives digestive, urinary, and reproductive products; only Australia has such forms, the duck-billed platypus (Ornithorhynchus) and the echidna (Tachyglossus). [mono- + G. trema, a hole]

monotreme (mon′o-trem)
A member of the order Monotremata.

monotrichate (mo-not′ri-kat)
SYN: monotrichous.

monotrichous (mo-not′ri-kus)
Denoting a microorganism possessing a single flagellum or cilium. SYN: monotrichate, uniflagellate.

monovalence, monovalency (mon-o-va′lens, -va′len-se)
A combining power (valence) equal to that of a hydrogen atom. SYN: univalence, univalency.

monovalent (mon-o-va′lent)
1. Having the combining power (valence) of a hydrogen atom. SYN: monatomic (2) , univalent. 2. Pertaining to a m. (specific) antiserum to a single antigen or organism.

monoxenous (mon-oks′e-nus)
SYN: monogenetic. [mono- + G. xenos, stranger]

monoxide (mon-ok′sid)
Any oxide having only one atom of oxygen; e.g., CO.

monozoic (mon-o-zo′ik)
Unisegmented, as in cestodarian tapeworms. See polyzoic.

monozygotic, monozygous (mon-o-zi-got′ik, -zi′gus)
SYN: unigerminal. See m. twins, under twin. [mono- + G. zygotos, yoked]

Monro
Alexander Sr., Scottish anatomist and surgeon, 1697–1767. See bursa of M..

Monro
Alexander, Jr., Scottish anatomist, 1733–1817. See M. doctrine, M. foramen, M. line, M. sulcus, M.-Kellie doctrine, M.-Richter line, Richter-M. line.

mons, gen. montis, pl .montes (monz, mon′tis, mon′tez) [TA]
An anatomical prominence or slight elevation above the general level of the surface. [L. a mountain] m. pubis [TA] the prominence caused by a pad of fatty tissue over the symphysis pubis in the female. SYN: pubes (2) [TA] , m. veneris, pubic bone. m. ureteris a pinkish prominence on the wall of the bladder marking each ureteral orifice. m. veneris SYN: m. pubis. [L. Venus]

Monson
George S., U.S. dentist, 1869–1933. See M. curve, anti-M. curve.

monster
Outmoded term for a malformed embryo, fetus, or individual. See entries beginning with terato-. See teras. [L. monstrum, an evil omen, a prodigy, a wonder]

montanic acid (mon-tan′ik)
SYN: octacosanoic acid. [montan (wax)]

Monteggia
Giovanni B., Italian surgeon, 1762–1815. See M. fracture.

montelukast sodium (mon-te-loo′kast)
A competitive and selective Cys-LT1-receptor antagonist that acts as a blocker of leukotrienes, which are potent endogenous bronchoconstrictors. A prophylactic; not useful to treat an ongoing attack of asthma.

Montgomery
William F., Irish obstetrician, 1797–1859. See M. follicles, under follicle, M. glands, under gland, M. tubercles, under tubercle.

monticulus, pl .monticuli (mon-tik′u-lus, -li)
1. Any slight rounded projection above a surface. 2. The central portion of the superior vermis forming a projection on the surface of the cerebellum; its anterior and most prominent portion is called the culmen, its posterior sloping portion, the declive. [L. dim. of mons, mountain] palmar monticuli three small elevations in the distal palm corresponding to the window-like deficiencies in the distal palmar aponeurosis between the four longitudinal bundles and proximal to the superficial transverse metacarpal ligament.

mood (mood)
The pervasive feeling, tone, and internal emotional state of an individual which, when impaired, can markedly influence virtually all aspects of a person's behavior or his or her perception of external events.

mood swing
Oscillation of a person's emotional feeling tone between periods of euphoria and depression.

Moon
Henry, English surgeon, 1845–1892. See M. molars, under molar.

Moon
Robert C., U.S. ophthalmologist, 1844–1914. See Laurence-M. syndrome.

Moore
Charles H., English surgeon, 1821–1870. See M. method.

Moore
Robert Foster, British ophthalmologist, 1878–1963. See M. lightning streaks, under streak.

Mooren
Albert, German ophthalmologist, 1828–1899. See M. ulcer.

Mooser
Hermann, Swiss pathologist in Mexico, 1891–1971. See M. bodies, under body.

MOPP
Acronym for mechlorethamine, oncovin (vincristine), procarbazine, and prednisone, a chemotherapy regimen used in the treatment of Hodgkin disease.

Morand
Sauveur F., French surgeon, 1697–1773. See M. foot, M. spur.

Morax
Victor, French ophthalmologist, 1866–1935. See Moraxella.

Moraxella (mor′ak-sel′a)
A genus of obligately aerobic nonmotile bacteria (family Neisseriaceae) containing Gram-negative coccoids or short rods that usually occur in pairs. They do not produce acid from carbohydrates, are oxidase positive and penicillin-susceptible, and infect the mucous membranes of humans and other mammals. The type species is M. lacunata. [V. Morax] M. anatipestifer a bacterial species causing a respiratory disease in ducklings. M. catarrhalis a bacterial species that causes upper respiratory tract infections, particularly in immunocompromised hosts; the type species of the genus M.. SYN: Branhamella catarrhalis. M. kingae SYN: Kingella kingae. M. lacunata a bacterial species causing conjunctivitis in humans; it is the type species of the genus M.. M. nonliquefaciens a bacterial species found in the respiratory tract of humans, especially in the nose; usually not pathogenic, but occasionally causes sinusitis. M. osloensis a bacterial species found in the genitourinary tract, blood, spinal and chest fluids, and nose; rarely found in the respiratory tract; usually not pathogenic, although some strains have been isolated from serious pathologic conditions in humans. M. phenylpyruvica a bacterial species of unknown pathogenicity found in the genitourinary tract, blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and in pus from various lesions.

morbid (mor′bid)
1. Diseased or pathologic. 2. In psychology, abnormal or deviant. [L. morbidus, ill, fr. morbus, disease]

morbidity (mor-bid′i-te)
1. A diseased state. 2. The ratio of sick to well in a community. SYN: morbility. SEE ALSO: m. rate. 3. The frequency of the appearance of complications following a surgical procedure or other treatment. maternal m. medical complications in a woman caused by pregnancy, labor, or delivery. puerperal m. illness arising during the first 10 days of the postpartum period, i.e., a temperature of 38°C (100.4°F) or more on any two days of the first 10, excluding the first 24 hours.

morbific (mor-bif′ik)
SYN: pathogenic. [L. morbus, disease, + facio, to make]

morbigenous (mor-bij′e-nus)
SYN: pathogenic. [L. morbus, disease, + G. -gen, producing]

morbility (mor-bil′i-te)
SYN: morbidity (2) .

morbilli (mor-bil′i)
SYN: measles (1) . [Mediev. L. morbillus, dim. of L. morbus, disease]




A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

. . . Feedback