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Medical Dictionary


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pexinogen (pek-sin′o-jen)
SYN: prochymosin.

pexis (pek′sis)
Fixation of substances in the tissues. [G. p., fixation]

-pexy
Fixation, usually surgical. [G. pexis, fixation]

Peyer
Johann K., Swiss anatomist, 1653–1712. See P. glands, under gland, aggregated lymphoid nodules of small intestine, under nodule.

peyote, peyotl (pa-yo′te, pa-yo′tl)
Aztec name for Lophophora williamsii, a small cactus indigenous to Mexico and the southwestern United States and used in Native American tribal ceremonies, where it produces a trance and hallucinations; principal active component of p. is mescaline. SYN: pellote. [Sp.]

Peyronie
Francois de la, French surgeon, 1678–1747. See P. disease.

Peyrot
Jean J., French surgeon, 1843–1918. See P. thorax.

Pezzer
O. de. See de P..

Pfannenstiel
Hermann Johann, German gynecologist, 1862–1909. See P. incision.

Pfaundler
Meinhard von, German physician, 1872–1947. See P.-Hurler syndrome.

Pfeiffer
Richard F.J., German physician, 1858–1945. See Pfeifferella, P. phenomenon, P. syndrome.

Pfeifferella (fi-fer-el′la)
An obsolete genus of bacteria, the type species of which, P. mallei, formerly was placed in the genus Actinobacillus and now is in the genus Pseudomonas. [R. F. J. Pfeiffer]

PFFD
Abbreviation for proximal femoral focal deficiency.

Pflüger
Eduard F.W., German anatomist and physiologist, 1829–1910. See P. law.

PFOB
Abbreviation for perfluorooctyl bromide.

Pfuhl
Eduard, German physician, 1852–1905. See P. sign.

PG
Abbreviation for prostaglandin.

pg
Symbol for picogram.

PGA, PGB, PGC, PGD
Abbreviations, with numeric subscripts according to structure, often used for prostaglandins. Letters A, B, etc., indicate the nature of the cyclopentane ring (substituents, double bonds, orientation); numerical subscripts indicate the number of double bonds in the alkyl chains.

P-glycoprotein (gli-ko-pro′ten)
Protein associated with tumor multidrug resistance; acts as energy-requiring efflux pump for many classes of natural products and chemotherapeutic drugs. SYN: P-170.

PGR
Abbreviation for psychogalvanic response.

P2Gri
Symbol for diphosphoglycerate.

1,3-P2Gri
Symbol for 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate.

2,3-P2Gri
Symbol for 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate.

Ph
Symbol for phenyl.

Ph1
Abbreviation for Philadelphia chromosome.

pH
Symbol for the negative decadic logarithm of the H+ ion concentration (measured in moles per liter); a solution with pH 7.00 (1 × 10−7 g molecular weight of hydrogen per liter) is neutral at 22°C ( i.e., [H+] = [OH−]), one with a pH value of more than 7.00 is alkaline, one with a pH lower than 7.00 is acid. At a temperature of 37°C, neutrality is at a pH value of 6.80. Cf.:dissociation constant of water. [p (power or potency) of [H+ ]] blood pH pH of arterial blood; normal is 7.4 (normal range 7.36–7.44). critical pH the pH range, about 5.5, at which saliva ceases to be saturated with respect to calcium and phosphate, and below which tooth mineral will dissolve. optimum pH the pH at which an enzymatic or any other reaction or process is most effective under a given set of conditions.

PHA
Abbreviation for phytohemagglutinin.

phaco-
1. Lens-shaped, relating to a lens; 2. Birthmark; as in phacomatosis. [G. phakos, lentil (lens), anything shaped like a lentil]

phacoanaphylaxis (fak′o-an-a-fi-lak′sis)
Hypersensitivity to protein of the lens of the eye.

phacocele (fak′o-sel)
Hernia of the lens of the eye through the sclera. [phaco- + G. kele, hernia]

phacocyst (fak′o-sist)
SYN: capsule of lens. [phaco- + G. kystis, bladder]

phacocystectomy (fak′o-sis-tek′to-me)
Rarely used term for surgical removal of a portion of the capsule of the lens of the eye. [phaco- + G. kystis, bladder, + ektome, excision]

phacodonesis (fak′o-don-e′sis)
Tremulousness of the lens of the eye. [phaco- + G. doneo, to shake to and fro]

phacoemulsification (fak′o-e-mul-si-fi-ka′shun)
A method of emulsifying and aspirating a cataract with a low-frequency ultrasonic needle.

phacoerysis (fak-o-er′i-sis)
Extraction of the lens of the eye by means of a suction cup called the erysophake. [phaco- + G. erysis, pulling, drawing off]

phacofragmentation (fak′o-frag′men-ta′shun)
Rupture and aspiration of the lens.

phacoid (fak′oyd)
Of lentil shape. [phaco- + G. eidos, resemblance]

phacolysis (fa-kol′i-sis)
Operative breaking down and removal of the lens. [phaco- + G. lysis, dissolution]

phacolytic (fak-o-lit′ik)
Characterized by or referring to phacolysis.

phacoma (fa-ko′ma)
A hamartoma found in phacomatosis; often refers to a retinal hamartoma in tuberous sclerosis. SYN: phakoma. [phaco- + G. -oma, tumor]

phacomalacia (fak′o-ma-la′she-a)
Softening of the lens, as may occur in hypermature cataract. [phaco- + G. malakia, softness]

phacomatosis (fak′o-ma-to′sis)
A generic term for a group of hereditary diseases characterized by hamartomas involving multiple tissues; e.g., von Hippel-Lindau disease, neurofibromatosis, Sturge-Weber syndrome, tuberous sclerosis. SYN: phakomatosis. [Van der Hoeve's coinage fr. G. phakos, mother-spot]

phacoscope (fak′o-skop)
An instrument in the form of a dark chamber for observing the changes in the lens during accommodation. [phaco- + G. skopeo, to view]

Phaenicia sericata (fen-i′se-a ser-i-ka′ta)
A common species of yellowish or metallic green blowfly (family Calliphoridae, order Diptera); an abundant scavenger feeding on carrion or excrement, and implicated in sheep strike and other forms of myiasis. SYN: Lucilia sericata.

phaeo-
See pheo-.

phaeohyphomycosis (fe′o-hi′fo-mi-ko′sis)
A group of superficial and deep infections caused by fungi that form pigmented hyphae and yeastlike cells in tissue, i.e., dematiaceous fungal infections other than chromoblastomycosis and mycetomas. In humans, cats, and horses, p. is caused by many species. [G. phaios, dusky, + hyphe, web, + mycosis]

phage (faj)
SYN: bacteriophage. β p. SYN: β corynebacteriophage. defective p. SYN: defective bacteriophage. Lambda p. a bacteriophage used extensively in experimental systems.

-phage, -phagia, -phagy
Eating, devouring. [G. phago, to eat]

phagedena (faj-e-de′na)
Obsolete term for an ulcer that rapidly spreads peripherally, destroying the tissues as it increases in size. [G. phagedaina, a canker] p. gangrenosa severe gangrene with sloughing. p. nosocomialis gangrene arising in a hospital from cross infection. p. tropica the tropical ulcer of Old World cutaneous leishmaniasis.

phagedenic (faj-e-den′ik)
Obsolete term for relating to or having the characteristics of phagedena.

phago-
Eating, devouring. [G. phago, to eat]

phagocyte (fag′o-sit)
A cell possessing the property of ingesting bacteria, foreign particles, and other cells. Phagocytes are divided into two general classes: 1) microphages, polymorphonuclear leukocytes that ingest chiefly bacteria; 2) macrophages, mononucleated cells (histiocytes and monocytes) that are largely scavengers, ingesting dead tissue and degenerated cells. SYN: carrier cell, scavenger cell. [phago- + G. kytos, cell]

phagocytic (fag-o-sit′ik)
Relating to phagocytes or phagocytosis.

phagocytin (fag-o-si′tin)
A very labile bactericidal substance that may be isolated from polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

phagocytize (fag′o-si-tiz)
SYN: phagocytose.

phagocytoblast (fag-o-si′to-blast)
A primitive cell developing into a phagocyte. [phagocyte + G. blastos, germ]

phagocytolysis (fag′o-si-tol′i-sis)
1. Destruction of phagocytes, or leukocytes, occurring in the process of blood coagulation or as the result of the introduction of certain antagonistic foreign substances into the body. SYN: phagolysis. 2. A spontaneous breaking down of the phagocytes, preliminary (according to Metchnikoff) to the liberation of cytase, or complement. [phagocyte + G. lysis, dissolution]

phagocytolytic (fag′o-si-to-lit′ik)
Relating to phagocytolysis. SYN: phagolytic.

phagocytose (fag′o-si-toz)
To perform phagocytosis, denoting the action of phagocytic cells. SYN: phagocytize.

phagocytosis (fag-o-si-to′sis)
The process of ingestion and digestion by cells of solid substances, e.g., other cells, bacteria, bits of necrosed tissue, foreign particles. SEE ALSO: endocytosis. [phagocyte + G. -osis, condition] induced p. p. occurring when bacteria are subjected to the action of opsonins in blood and then brought in contact with leukocytes. spontaneous p. p. occurring when a culture of bacteria is brought in contact with washed leukocytes in an indifferent medium, such as a physiologic salt solution.

phagodynamometer (fag′o-di-na-mom′e-ter)
A device for measuring the force required to chew various foods. [phago- + G. dynamis, force, + metron, measure]

phagolysis (fa-gol′i-sis)
SYN: phagocytolysis (1) .

phagolysosome (fag-o-li′so-som)
A body formed by union of a phagosome or ingested particle with a lysosome having hydrolytic enzymes.

phagolytic (fag-o-lit′ik)
SYN: phagocytolytic.

phagophobia (fag-o-fo′be-a)
Morbid fear of eating. [phago- + G. phobos, fear]

phagosome (fag′o-som)
A vesicle that forms around a particle (bacterial or other) within the phagocyte that engulfed it, separates from the cell membrane, and then fuses with and receives the contents of cytoplasmic granules (lysosomes), thus forming a phagolysosome in which digestion of the engulfed particle occurs. [phago- + G. soma, body]

phagotype (fag′o-tip)
In microbiology, a subdivision of a species distinguished from other strains therein by sensitivity to a certain bacteriophage or set of bacteriophages. [phago- + G. typos, type]

-phagy
See -phage.

phako-
For words so beginning and not listed here, see phaco-.

phakoma (fa-ko′ma)
SYN: phacoma.

phakomatosis (fak′o-ma-to′sis)
SYN: phacomatosis.




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