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Medical Dictionary - Dictionary of Medicine and Human Biology


Medical Dictionary


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phrenicotripsy (fren′i-ko-trip′se)
SYN: phreniclasia. [phrenico- + G. tripsis, a rubbing]

phreno-, phren-, phreni-, phrenico-
1. The diaphragm. 2. The mind. 3. The phrenic nerve. [G. phren, diaphragm, mind, heart (as seat of emotions)]

phrenocardia (fren-o-kar′de-a)
Precordial pain and dyspnea of psychogenic origin, often a symptom of anxiety neurosis. See cardiac neurosis. SYN: cardiophrenia. [phreno- + G. kardia, heart]

phrenocolic (fren′o-kol′ik)
SYN: phrenicocolic. [phreno- + G. kolon, colon]

phrenogastric (fren-o-gas′trik)
SYN: phrenicogastric. [phreno- + G. gaster, stomach]

phrenograph (fren′o-graf)
An instrument for recording graphically the movements of the diaphragm. [phreno- + G. grapho, to record]

phrenohepatic (fren′o-he-pat′ik)
SYN: phrenicohepatic. [phreno- + G. hepar, liver]

phrenologist (fre-nol′o-jist)
One who claims to be able to diagnose mental and behavioral characteristics by a study of the external configuration of the skull. [see phrenology]

phrenology (fre-nol′o-je)
An obsolete doctrine that each of the mental faculties is located in a definite part of the cerebral cortex, the size of which part varies in a direct ratio with the development and strength of the corresponding faculty, this size being indicated by the external configuration of the skull. SYN: craniognomy. [phreno- + G. logos, study]

phrenoplegia (fren-o-ple′je-a)
Paralysis of the diaphragm. [phreno- + G. plege, stroke]

phrenoptosia (fren-op-to′se-a)
An abnormal sinking down of the diaphragm. [phreno- + G. ptosis, a falling]

phrenosin (fren′o-sin)
A cerebroside abundant in white matter of the brain, composed of cerebronic acid, d-galactose, and sphingosine. SYN: cerebron.

phrenosinic acid (fren-o-sin′ik)
SYN: cerebronic acid.

phrenospasm (fren′o-spazm)
Diaphragmatic spasm, as in hiccup. [phreno- + G. spasmos, spasm]

phrenotropic (fren-o-trop′ik)
Affecting or working through the mind or brain. [phreno- + G. trope, a turning]

phrynoderma (frin-o-der′ma)
A follicular hyperkeratotic eruption thought to be due to deficiency of vitamin A. SYN: toad skin. [G. phrynos, toad, + derma, skin]

phrynolysin (fri-nol′i-sin)
The poison of the fire-toad (Bombinator igneus). [G. phrynos, toad, + lysis, solution]

PHS
Abbreviation for Public Health Service.

pH-stat
A device for continuously sensing the pH of a solution and automatically adding acid or alkali as necessary to keep the pH constant; used to follow the time course of reactions that liberate an acid or alkali.

phthalein (thal′e-in)
One of a group of highly colored compounds based on a triphenylmethyl base; e.g., phenolphthalein.

phthalic acid (thal′ik)
o-Benzenedicarboxylic acid.

phthaloyl (thal′o-il)
The diacyl radical of phthalic acid.

phthalyl (thal′il)
The monoacyl radical of phthalic acid.

phthalylsulfacetamide (thal′il-sul-fa-set′a-mid)
N1-acetyl-N4-phthalylsulfanilamide;a sulfonamide used in the treatment of enteric infections.

phthalylsulfathiazole (thal′il-sul-fa-thi′a-zol)
A sulfonamide used in the treatment of enteric infections.

phthiriophobia (thi′re-o-fo′be-a)
SYN: pediculophobia. [G. phtheir, louse, + phobos, fear]

Phthirus (thi′rus)
See Pthirus. [L. phthir; G. phtheir, a louse]

phthisio-
Phthisis (tuberculosis). [G. phthisis, a wasting]

phthisiologist (thi-ze-ol′o-jist)
Obsolete term for specialist in tuberculosis.

phyco-
Seaweed. [G. phykos]

Phycomycetes (fi′ko-mi-se′tez)
SYN: Zygomycetes. [phyco- + G. mykes, fungus]

phycomycetosis (fi′ko-mi-se-to′sis)
SYN: zygomycosis.

phycomycosis (fi′ko-mi′ko-sis)
SYN: zygomycosis. subcutaneous p. SYN: entomophthoramycosis basidiobolae.

phylacagogic (fi-lak-a-goj′ik)
Stimulating the production of protective antibodies. [G. phylaxis, a guarding, protection, + agogos, leading]

phylaxis (fi-lak′sis)
Protection against infection. [G. a guarding, protection]

phyletic (fi-let′ik)
Denoting the evolution of sequential changes in a line of descent by which one species is transformed into a new species. [G. phyletikos, tribal, fr. phyle, a tribe]

phyllo-
A leaf; leaf-like; chlorophyll. [G. phyllon, foliage]

phyllode (fil′od)
A flattened leaflike petiole; applied to any structure resembling a leaf, especially to a cross section of a neoplasm with a foliated structure, such as cystosarcoma phyllodes. [G. phyllodes, like leaves, fr. phyllon, leaf, + eidos, resemblance]

phylloquinone (K) , phylloquinone K (fil-o-kwin′on, -kwi′non)
Isolated from alfalfa; also prepared synthetically; major form of vitamin K found in plants. SYN: phytomenadione, phytonadione, vitamin K1, vitamin K1(20). p. reductase SYN: NADPH dehydrogenase (quinone).

phylo-
Tribe, race; a taxonomic phylum. [G. phylon, tribe]

phyloanalysis (fi′lo-a-nal′i-sis)
1. The study of bioracial origins. 2. A rarely used term for a method of investigating individual and collective behavioral disorders putatively arising from impaired tensional processes. [phylo- + analysis]

phylogenesis (fi-lo-jen′e-sis)
SYN: phylogeny. [phylo- + G. genesis, origin]

phylogenetic, phylogenic (fi′lo-je-net′ik, -jen′ik)
Relating to phylogenesis.

phylogeny (fi-loj′e-ne)
The evolutionary development of species, as distinguished from ontogeny, development of the individual. SYN: phylogenesis.

phylum, pl .phyla (fi′lum, fi′la)
A taxonomic division below the kingdom and above the class. [Mod. L. fr. G. phylon, tribe]

phymatoid (fi′ma-toyd)
Resembling a neoplasm. [G. phyma, a tumor, + eidos, resemblance]

phymatorrhysin (fi′ma-tor′i-sin)
A variety of melanin obtained from certain melanotic neoplasms, and from hair and other heavily pigmented parts. [G. phyma (phymat-), tumor, + rhysis, a flowing]

Physa (fi′sa)
Type genus of the freshwater pulmonate snails (family Physidae), which includes several common American species such as P. parkeri, P. gyrina, and P. integra; they are intermediate hosts of a number of bird and animal trematodes, including several that cause schistosome dermatitis in humans. [G. a pair of bellows; an air bubble; bladder]

Physalia
A genus of the invertebrate phylum Cnidaria that includes the Portuguese man-of-war. P. physalis the Portuguese man-of-war, a jellyfishlike animal consisting of a complex colony of individual members that can inflict extremely painful stings. SYN: Portuguese man-of-war.

physaliferous (fis-a-lif′er-us)
SYN: physaliphorous.

physaliform (fi-sal′i-form)
Like a bubble or small bleb. [G. physallis, bladder, bubble, + L. forma, form]

physaliphore (fi-sal′i-for)
A mother cell, or giant cell containing a large vacuole, in a malignant growth. [G. physallis, bladder, bubble, + phoros, bearing]

physaliphorous (fis-a-lif′or-us)
Having bubbles or vacuoles. SYN: physaliferous. [G. physallis, bladder, bubble, + phoros, bearing]

physalis (fis′a-lis)
A vacuole in a giant cell found in certain malignant neoplasms, such as chordoma. [G. physallis, a bladder]

Physaloptera (fi′sa-lop′ter-a, fis-)
A large genus of spiruroid roundworms parasitic in the stomach and duodenum of vertebrates, especially birds and mammals; they are transmitted via insect and annelid intermediate hosts and are frequently pathogenic, causing erosions and catarrhal gastritis. P. caucasica is a species reported in humans in the southern part of the USSR; P. mordens is a species from tropical Africa found only rarely in the esophagus, stomach, and intestine of humans (probably cases of temporary infection from ingestion of infected insects). [G. physallis, bladder, + pteron, wing]

physalopteriasis (fi′sa-lop-ter-i′a-sis)
Infection of animals and humans with nematodes of the genus Physaloptera.

physeal (fiz′e-al)
Pertaining to the physis, or growth cartilage area, separating the metaphysis and the epiphysis in skeletally immature bones.

physi-
See physio-.

physiatrician (fiz′e-a-trish′un)
A physician who specializes in physiatry (rehabilitation medicine).

physiatrics (fiz-e-at′riks)
1. Old term for physical therapy. 2. Rehabilitation management. [G. physis, nature, + iatrikos, healing]

physiatrist (fiz-i′a-trist)
A physician who specializes in physical medicine.

physiatry (fi-zi′a-tre; fiz-e-at′re)
SYN: physical medicine.

physic (fiz′ik)
1. The art of medicine. 2. A medicine; often a lay term for a cathartic. [G. physikos, natural, physical]

physical (fiz′i-kal)
Relating to the body, as distinguished from the mind. [Mod. L. physicalis, fr. G. physikos]

physician (fi-zish′un)
1. A doctor; a person who has been educated, trained, and licensed to practice the art and science of medicine. 2. A practitioner of medicine, as contrasted with a surgeon. [Fr. physicien, a natural philosopher] attending p. 1. p. responsible for the care of a patient; 2. p. supervising the care of patients by interns, residents, and/or medical students. 3. a doctor who has completed internship and residency. family p. a p. who specializes in family practice. hospital-based p. SYN: hospitalist (1) . osteopathic p. a practitioner of osteopathy. SYN: osteopath. resident p. SYN: resident.

physician assistant (P.A.)
A person who is trained, certified, and licensed to perform history taking, physical examination, diagnosis, and treatment of commonly encountered medical problems, and certain technical skills, under the supervision of a licensed physician, and who thereby extends the physician's capacity to provide medical care. Many subspecialties exist, such as orthopedist's assistant, sports injury assistant, pediatrician's assistant, etc.

Physick
Philip Syng, U.S. surgeon, 1768–1837. See P. pouches, under pouch.

physicochemical (fiz′i-ko-kem′i-kal)
Relating to the field of physical chemistry.

physics (fiz′iks)
The branch of science concerned with the phenomena of matter and energy and their interactions. See physic. radiation p. the scientific discipline of the application of p. to the use of ionizing radiation in therapy and in diagnostic radiology; including, by extension, nuclear medicine applications, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging.

physio-, physi-
1. Physical, physiological. 2. Natural, relating to physics. [G. physis, nature]

physiogenic (fiz′e-o-jen′ik)
Related to or caused by physiologic activity. [physio- + G. genesis, origin]

physiognomy (fiz-e-og′no-me)
1. The physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character. 2. Estimation of one's character and mental qualities by a study of the face and other external bodily features. [physio- + G. gnomon, a judge]




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