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Medical Dictionary


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scapulary (skap′u-lar-e)
A form of brace or suspender for keeping a belt or body bandage in place.

scapulectomy (skap′u-lek′to-me)
Excision of the scapula. [scapula + G. ektome, excision]

scapulo-
Scapula, scapular. [L. scapulae, shoulder blades]

scapuloclavicular (skap′u-lo-kla-vik′u-lar)
1. SYN: acromioclavicular. 2. SYN: coracoclavicular.

scapulodynia (skap′u-lo-din′e-a)
SYN: scapulalgia. [scapulo- + G. odyne, pain]

scapulohumeral (skap′u-lo-hu′mer-al)
Relating to both scapula and humerus. SEE ALSO: glenohumeral.

scapulopexy (skap′u-lo-pek-se)
Operative fixation of the scapula to the chest wall or to the spinous process of the vertebrae. [scapulo- + G. pexis, fixation]

scapus, pl .scapi (ska′pus, -pi)
A shaft or stem. [L. shaft, stalk] s. penis SYN: body of penis. s. pili SYN: hair shaft.

scar (skar)
Fibrous tissue replacing normal tissues destroyed by injury or disease. [G. eschara, scab] cigarette-paper scars atrophic scars in the skin at sites of minor lacerations over the knees, shins, and elbows of persons with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. SYN: papyraceous scars. hypertrophic s. an elevated s. resembling a keloid but which does not spread into surrounding tissues, is rarely painful, and regresses spontaneously; collagen bundles run parallel to the skin surface. papyraceous scars SYN: cigarette-paper scars. radial s. SYN: radial sclerosing lesion.

Scardino
Peter T., U.S. urologist, *1915. See S. vertical flap pyeloplasty.

Scarff
John E., U.S. neurosurgeon, 1898–1978. See Stookey-S. operation.

scarification (skar-i-fi-ka′shun)
The making of a number of superficial incisions in the skin. [L. scarifico, to scratch, fr. G. skariphos, a style for sketching]

scarify (skar′i-fi)
To produce scarification.

scarlatina (skar′la-te′na)
An acute exanthematous disease, caused by infection with streptococcal organisms producing erythrogenic toxin, marked by fever and other constitutional disturbances, and a generalized eruption of closely aggregated points or small macules of a bright red color followed by desquamation in large scales, shreds, or sheets; mucous membrane of the mouth and fauces is usually also involved. SYN: scarlet fever. [through It. fr. Mediev. L. scarlatum, scarlet, a scarlet cloth] anginose s., s. anginosa a form of s. in which the throat affection is unusually severe. SYN: Fothergill disease (2) . s. hemorrhagica a form of s. in which blood extravasates into the skin and mucous membranes, giving to the eruption a dusky hue; frequent bleeding from the nose and into the intestine also occurs. s. latens, latent s. a form of s. in which the rash is absent, but other complications of streptococcal infection occur, such as acute nephritis. s. maligna a severe scarlet fever in which the patient is quickly overcome with the intensity of the systemic intoxication. s. rheumatica SYN: dengue. s. simplex a mild form of the disease.

scarlatinal (skar-la-te′nal)
Relating to scarlatina.

scarlatinella (skar-la-ti-nel′a)
SYN: Filatov-Dukes disease. [dim. of scarlatina]

scarlatiniform (skar-la-te′ni-form, -tin′i-form)
Resembling scarlatina, denoting a rash. SYN: scarlatinoid (1) .

scarlatinoid (skar-la-te′noyd, skar-lat′i-noyd)
1. SYN: scarlatiniform. 2. SYN: Filatov-Dukes disease. [scarlatina + G. eidos, resemblance]

scarlet (skar′let)
Denoting a bright red color tending toward orange. [Mediev. L. scarlatum, s. cloth]

scarlet red [C.I. 26905]
An azo dye; a dark, brownish red powder, soluble in oils, fats, and chloroform, but insoluble in water; used in medicine as a vulnerary, in histology to stain fat in tissue sections and basic proteins at high pH, and in immunoelectrophoresis. SYN: Biebrich s., medicinal s., scharlach red, Sudan IV.

scarlet red sulfonate
An azo dye that has been used to stimulate healing of chronic superficial wounds and ulcers.

Scarpa
Antonio, Italian anatomist, orthopedist, and ophthalmologist, 1747–1832. See canals of S., under canal, membranous layer of subcutaneous tissue of abdomen, S. fluid, S. foramina, under foramen, fossa scarpae major, S. ganglion, S. habenula, S. hiatus, S. liquor, S. membrane, S. method, S. sheath, S. staphyloma, S. triangle.

Scatchard
George, U.S. chemist and biochemist, 1892–1973. See S. plot.

scatemia (ska-te′me-a)
Intestinal autointoxication. [scato- + G. haima, blood]

scato-
Feces. SEE ALSO: copro-, sterco-. [G. skor (skat-), excrement]

scatologic (skat-o-loj′ik)
Pertaining to scatology.

scatology (ska-tol′o-je)
1. The scientific study and analysis of feces, for physiologic and diagnostic purposes. SYN: coprology. 2. The study relating to the psychiatric aspects of excrement or excremental (anal) function. [scato- + G. logos, study]

scatoma (ska-to′ma)
SYN: fecaloma. [scato- + G. -oma, tumor]

scatophagy (ska-tof′a-je)
SYN: coprophagia. [scato- + G. phago, to eat]

scatoscopy (ska-tos′ko-pe)
Examination of the feces for purposes of diagnosis. [scato- + G. skopeo, to view]

scatter (skat′er)
1. A change in direction of a photon or subatomic particle, as the result of a collision or interaction. 2. The secondary radiation resulting from the interaction of primary radiation with matter. Compton s. the mechanism of s. called the Compton effect.

scattergram (skat-er-gram)
Graphical display of distribution of two variables in relation to each other. [scatter + G. gramma, something written]

scatula (skat′u-la)
A square pillbox. [Mediev. L. a rectangular figure whose width is one-tenth of its length]

Scedosporium (se-do-spor′e-um)
An imperfect fungus of the form-class Hyphomycetes; anamorph of Pseudallescheria. S. apiospermum (sked-os-por′e-um) the imperfect state of the fungus Pseudallescheria boydii, one of the 16 species of true fungi that may cause mycetoma in humans or severe infection in immunosuppressed patients. S. inflatum See S. prolificans. S. prolificans a mold; a rare cause of deep fungal infection. Formerly called S. inflatum.

scelalgia (se-lal′je-a)
Pain in the leg. [G. skelos, leg, + algos, pain]

scene


scent (sent)
SYN: odor. [M.E., fr. O.Fr., fr. L. sentio, to feel]

Schacher
Polycarp G., German physician, 1674–1737. See S. ganglion.

Schaer reagent
See under reagent.

Schäfer
Sir Edward A. Sharpey-, English physiologist and histologist, 1850–1935. See S. method.

Schäffer
Max, German neurologist, 1852–1923. See S. reflex.

Schaffer test
See under test.

Schamberg
Jay F., U.S. dermatologist, 1870–1934. See S. fever.

Schapiro
Heinrich, Russian physician, 1852–1901. See S. sign.

Schardinger
Franz, Austrian scientist, 1853–1920. See S. dextrins, under dextrin, S. enzyme, S. reaction.

scharlach red (shar′lak)
SYN: scarlet red.

Schatzki
Richard, U.S. radiologist, 1901–1992. See S. ring.

Schaudinn
Fritz R., German bacteriologist, 1871–1906. See S. fixative.

Schaumann
Jörgen N., Swedish physician, 1879–1953. See S. bodies, under body, S. lymphogranuloma, S. syndrome, Besnier-Boeck-S. disease, Besnier-Boeck-S. syndrome.

Schaumberg
H.H., U.S. neuropathologist, *1912.

Schauta
Friedrich, Austrian gynecologist, 1849–1919. See S. vaginal operation.

Schede
Max, German surgeon, 1844–1902. See S. method.

schedule (sked′jool)
A procedural plan for a proposed objective, especially the sequence and time allotted for each item or operation required for its completion. [L. scheda, fr. scida, a strip of papyrus, leaf of paper] schedules of reinforcement in the psychology of conditioning, established procedures or sequences for reinforcing operant behavior; e.g., in a lever-pressing situation, every displacement of the lever will bring a pellet of food or comparable reinforcer (continuous reinforcement s.), or the reinforcer will come at every 5 seconds, regardless of how many displacements occur earlier (fixed-interval reinforcement s.), at every 10th displacement (fixed-ratio reinforcement s.), or on an average of every 5 seconds (variable-interval reinforcement s.), or the reinforcer will come in a noncontinuous fashion in which less than 100% of the displacements bring a reinforcer (intermittent reinforcement s.).

Scheele
Karl W., Swedish chemist, 1742–1786. See S. green.

Scheibe
A., U.S. physician, *1875. See S. hearing impairment.

Scheibler reagent
See under reagent.

Scheie
Harold G., U.S. ophthalmologist, *1909. See S. syndrome.

Scheiner
Christoph, German physicist, 1575–1650. See S. experiment.

Schellong
Fritz, German physician, 1891–1953. See S. test, S.-Strisower phenomenon.

schema, pl .schemata (ske′ma, ske-mah′ta)
1. A plan, outline, or arrangement. SYN: scheme. 2. In sensorimotor theory, the organized unit of cognitive experience. [G. s., shape, form] body s. SYN: body image.

schematic (ske-mat′ik)
Made after a definite type of formula; representing in general, but not with absolute exactness; denoting an anatomical drawing or model. [G. schematikos, in outward show, fr. schema, shape, form]

schematograph (ske-mat′o-graf)
An instrument for making a tracing in reduced size of the outline of the body. [G. schema, form, + grapho, to write]

scheme (skem)
SYN: schema (1) . occlusal s. SYN: occlusal system.

schemochromes (ske-mo-kromz)
SYN: structural color.

Schenck
Benjamin R., U.S. surgeon, 1873–1920. See S. disease.

Scheuermann
Holger W., Danish surgeon, 1877–1960. See S. disease.

Schick
Bela, Austrian pediatrician in U.S., 1877–1967. See S. method, S. test, S. test toxin.

Schiff
Hugo, German chemist in Florence, 1834–1915. See S. base, S. reagent, Kasten fluorescent S. reagents, under reagent, periodic acid-S. stain, ninhydrin-S. stain for proteins.

Schiff
Moritz, German physiologist, 1823–1896. See S.-Sherrington phenomenon.

Schilder
Paul Ferdinand, Austrian neurologist, 1886–1940.

Schiller
Walter, Austrian pathologist in U.S., 1887–1960. See S. test.

Schilling
Victor, German hematologist, 1883–1960. See S. blood count, S. band cell, S. index, S. test, S. type of monocytic leukemia.

schindylesis (skin-di-le′sis) [TA]
A form of fibrous joint in which the sharp edge of one bone is received in a cleft in the edge of the other, as in the articulation of the vomer with the rostrum of the sphenoid. SYN: schindyletic joint, wedge-and-groove joint, wedge-and-groove suture. [G. s., splintering]

Schiötz
Hjalmar, Norwegian physician, 1850–1927. See S. tonometer.

Schirmer
Otto W.A., German ophthalmologist, 1864–1917. See S. test.

schisto-
Cleft, division. SEE ALSO: schizo-. [G. schistos, split]

schistocelia (skis-to-se′le-a)
Congenital fissure of the abdominal wall. [schisto- + G. koilia, a hollow]




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