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Medical Dictionary


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stearaldehyde (ste-a-ral′de-hid)
SYN: stearal.

stearate (ste′a-rat)
A salt of stearic acid.

stearic acid (ste′a-rik)
n-Octadecanoic acid;one of the most abundant fatty acids found in animal lipids; used in pharmaceutical preparations, ointments, soaps, and suppositories.

stearin (ste′a-rin)
Tristearoylglycerol;the “triglyceride” of stearic acid present in solid animal fats and in some vegetable fats; source of stearic acid; commercial s. also contains some palmitic acid. SYN: tristearin.

Stearns
A. Warren, U.S. physician, 1885–1959.

stearo-, stear-
Combining form denoting fat. SEE ALSO: steato-. [G. stear, tallow]

stearrhea (ste-a-re′a)
SYN: steatorrhea.

stearyl alcohol (ste′a-ril)
An ingredient of hydrophilic ointment and hydrophilic petrolatum; also used in the preparation of creams.

stearyl-CoA, stearyl-coenzyme A
The coenzyme A thioester of stearic acid; precursor to oleic acid and, in the brain, the C22 and C24 fatty acids present in sphingomyelins; in the brain, use of stearyl-CoA increases during myelination. stearyl-CoA desaturase a protein complex that is key in the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids; it introduces a double bond at &Udelta;9; high dietary levels of unsaturated fatty acids decrease this enzyme's activity in the liver; a number of agents will induce this enzyme ( E.G., insulin, hydrocortisone, and triiodothyronine).

steatite (ste′a-tit)
Talc in the form of a mass.

steatitis (ste-a-ti′tis)
Inflammation of adipose tissue. [G. stear (steat-), tallow, + -itis, inflammation]

steato-
Combining form denoting fat. See stearo-. [G. stear (steat-), tallow]

steatocystoma (ste′a-to-sis-to′ma)
A cyst with sebaceous gland cells in its wall. s. multiplex widespread, multiple, thin-walled cysts of the skin that are lined by squamous epithelium, including lobules of sebaceous cells.

steatogenesis (ste′a-to-jen′e-sis)
Biosynthesis of lipids. The term is used specifically to designate lipid accumulation in the testes of nonmammalian vertebrates on completion of spermatogenesis in the breeding period. [steato- + G. genesis, production]

steatolysis (ste-a-tol′i-sis)
The hydrolysis or emulsion of fat in the process of digestion. [steato- + G. lysis, dissolution]

steatolytic (ste-a-to-lit′ik)
Relating to steatolysis.

steatonecrosis (ste′a-to-ne-kro′sis)
SYN: fat necrosis. [steato- + G. nekrosis, death]

steatopyga, steatopygia (ste′a-to-pi′ga, -pij′e-a)
Excessive accumulation of fat on the buttocks. [steato- + G. pyge, buttocks]

steatopygous (ste-a-top′a-gus)
Having excessively fat buttocks.

steatorrhea (ste′a-to-re′a)
Passage of fat in large amounts in the feces, due to failure to digest and absorb it; occurs in pancreatic disease and the malabsorption syndromes. SYN: fat indigestion. SYN: stearrhea. [steato- + G. rhoia, a flow] biliary s. s. due to the absence of bile from the intestine; usually accompanied by jaundice. intestinal s. s. due to malabsorption resulting from intestinal disease. SEE ALSO: sprue, celiac disease. pancreatic s. s. due to the absence of pancreatic juice from the intestine.

steatosis (ste-a-to′sis)
1. SYN: adiposis. 2. SYN: fatty degeneration. [steato- + G. -osis, condition] s. cardiaca excessive fat on the pericardium and invading the cardiac muscle. s. cordis fatty degeneration of the heart. hepatic s. SYN: fatty liver.

steatozoon (ste′a-to-zo′on)
Common name for Demodex folliculorum. [steato- + G. zoon, animal]

Steele
John C., Canadian neurologist, fl. 1951–1968. See S.-Richardson-Olszewski disease, S.-Richardson-Olszewski syndrome.

Steell
Graham, British physician, 1851–1942. See Graham S. murmur.

Steenbock
Harry, U.S. physiologist and chemist, 1886–1967. See S. unit.

stege (ste′ge)
The internal pillar of Corti organ. [G. stegos, roof, a house]

stegnosis (steg-no′sis)
1. A stoppage of any of the secretions or excretions. 2. A constriction or stenosis. [G. stoppage]

stegnotic (steg-not′ik)
1. Astringent or constipating. 2. An astringent or constipating agent.

Stein
Stanislav A.F. von, Russian otologist, *1855. See S. test.

Stein
Irving F., U.S. gynecologist, *1887. See S.-Leventhal syndrome.

Steinberg
I. See S. thumb sign.

Steinbrinck
W., 20th century Germany physician. See Chédiak-S.-Higashi anomaly, Chédiak-S.-Higashi syndrome.

Steinert
Hans, German physician, *1875. See S. disease.

Steinmann
Fritz, Swiss surgeon, 1872–1932. See S. pin.

steinstrasse (stin′stra-se)
A complication of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for urinary tract calculi in which stone fragments block the ureter to form a “stone street.” [Ger. Stein, stone, + Strasse, street]

STEL
Abbreviation for short-term exposure limit.

stella, pl .stellae (stel′a, -e)
A star or star-shaped figure. [Mod. L.] s. lentis hyaloidea the posterior pole of the lens. See radii lentis, under radius. s. lentis iridica the anterior pole of the lens. See radii lentis, under radius.

stellate (stel′at)
Star-shaped. [L. stella, a star]

stellectomy (stel-ek′to-me)
Stellate ganglionectomy.

stellula, pl .stellulae (stel′u-la, -le)
A small star or star-shaped figure. [L. dim. of stella, star] stellulae vasculosae SYN: stellulae winslowii. stellulae verheyenii SYN: venulae stellatae, under venula. stellulae winslowii capillary whorls in the lamina choroidocapillaris from which arise the venae vorticosae. SYN: stellulae vasculosae, Winslow stars.

Stellwag
Carl von C., Austrian ophthalmologist, 1823–1904. See S. sign.

stem
A supporting structure similar to the stalk of a plant. brain s. brainstem. infundibular s. the neural component of the pituitary stalk that contains nerve tracts passing from the hypothalamus to the pars nervosa. SYN: infundibular stalk.

sten.
A statistical term which uses the standard deviation to convert data into standardized scores which define 10 steps along a normal distribution, with five steps on either side of the mean.

Stender
Wilhelm P., 19th century Leipzig manufacturer of scientific apparatus. See S. dish.

Stenger test
See under test.

stenion (sten′e-on)
The termination in either temporal fossa of the shortest transverse diameter of the skull; a craniometric point. [G. stenos, narrow, + dim. -ion]

Steno
See Stensen.

steno-
Narrowness, constriction; opposite of eury-. [G. stenos, narrow]

stenobregmatic (sten′o-breg-mat′ik)
Denoting a skull narrow anteriorly, at the part where the bregma is. [steno- + G. bregma]

stenocardia (sten-o-kar′de-a)
SYN: angina pectoris. [steno- + G. kardia, heart]

stenocephalia (sten-o-se-fa′le-a)
SYN: stenocephaly.

stenocephalous, stenocephalic (sten-o-sef′a-lus, -se-fal′ik)
Pertaining to, or characterized by, stenocephaly.

stenocephaly (sten-o-sef′a-le)
Marked narrowness of the head. SYN: stenocephalia. [steno- + G. kephale, head]

stenochoria (sten-o-ko′re-a)
Abnormal contraction of any canal or orifice, especially of the lacrimal ducts. [G. s., narrowness, fr. steno- + chora, place, room]

stenocompressor (sten′o-kom-pres′er, or)
An instrument for compressing the ducts of the parotid glands (Stensen duct) in order to keep back the saliva during dental operations.

stenocrotaphy, stenocrotaphia (sten′o-krot′a-fe, -kro-ta′fe-a)
Narrowness of the skull in the temporal region; the condition of a stenobregmate skull. [steno- + G. krotaphos, temple]

Stenon
See Stensen. [Stenonius, Latin form of Stensen]

stenopeic, stenopaic (sten-o-pe′ik, sten-o-pa′ik)
Provided with a narrow opening or slit, as in s. spectacles. [steno- + G. ope, opening]

stenosal (ste-no′sal)
SYN: stenotic.

stenosed (sten′ozd)
Narrowed; contracted; strictured.

stenosis, pl .stenoses (ste-no′sis, -sez)
A stricture of any canal or orifice. [G. s., a narrowing] aortic s. pathologic narrowing of the aortic valve orifice. bronchial s. narrowing of the lumen of a bronchial tube. SYN: bronchiostenosis. buttonhole s. extreme narrowing, usually of the mitral valve. calcific nodular aortic s. most common type of aortic s., occurring usually in elderly men, in which the cusps contain calcified fibrous nodules on both surfaces; the causes include rheumatic fever, atherosclerosis, age-related degeneration, and congenitally bicuspid aortic valve. congenital pyloric s. SYN: hypertrophic pyloric s.. coronary ostial s. narrowing of the mouths of the coronary arteries as a result of syphilitic aortitis or atherosclerosis. Dittrich s. SYN: infundibular s.. double aortic s. subaortic s. associated with s. of the valve itself, both lesions being congenital. fish-mouth mitral s. extreme mitral s.. hypertrophic pyloric s. muscular hypertrophy of the pyloric sphincter, associated with projectile vomiting appearing in the first few weeks of life, more commonly seen in males. SYN: congenital pyloric s.. idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic s. left ventricular outflow obstruction due to hypertrophy, usually congenital, of the ventricular septum. SYN: muscular subaortic s.. idiopathic subglottic s. narrowing of the infraglottic lumen, of unknown cause; apparently occurring only in women. infundibular s. narrowing of the outflow tract of the right ventricle below the pulmonic valve; may be due to a localized fibrous diaphragm just below the valve or, more commonly, to a long narrow fibromuscular channel. SYN: Dittrich s.. laryngeal s. narrowing or stricture of any or all areas of the larynx; may be congenital or acquired. mitral s. (MS) pathologic narrowing of the orifice of the mitral valve. muscular subaortic s. SYN: idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic s.. pulmonary s. narrowing of the opening into the pulmonary artery from the right ventricle. pyloric s. narrowing of the gastric pylorus, especially by congenital muscular hypertrophy or scarring resulting from a peptic ulcer. SEE ALSO: hypertrophic pyloric s.. subaortic s. congenital narrowing of the outflow tract of the left ventricle by a ring of fibrous tissue or by hypertrophy of the muscular septum below the aortic valve. SYN: subvalvar s.. subvalvar s. SYN: subaortic s.. subvalvular aortic s. congenital narrowing below the aortic valves due to a membrane or to a muscular hypertrophy frequently confused with valvular aortic s.. supravalvar s. narrowing of the aorta above the aortic valve by a constricting ring or shelf, or by coarctation or hypoplasia of the ascending aorta. supravalvular s. s. distal to the aortic valve due usually to a congenital membrane. Patients usually have a kind of elfin facies and resemble each other more than they do members of their family. tricuspid s. pathologic narrowing of the orifice of the tricuspid valve.

stenostenosis (sten′o-ste-no′sis)
Stricture of the parotid duct (Steno or Stensen duct).

stenostomia (sten-o-sto′me-a)
Narrowness of the oral cavity. [steno- + G. stoma, mouth]

stenothermal (sten-o-ther′mal)
Thermostable through a narrow temperature range; able to withstand only slight changes in temperature. [steno- + G. therme, heat]

stenothorax (sten′o-thor′aks)
A narrow contracted chest. [steno- + thorax]

stenotic (ste-not′ik)
Narrowed; affected with stenosis. SYN: stenosal.

Stenotrophomonas (sten′o-tro-fo-mon′as)
A genus of Gram-negative bacilli that typically reside in soil and water and are not a part of normal human flora. S. maltophilia an opportunistic ocular bacterial pathogen producing keratitis, keratopathy, and conjuntivitis; a Gram-negative nonsporebearing rod, a major emerging nosocomial pathogen, it is of especial importance in intensive care units in part because of its resistance to most penicillins and to cephalosporins and aminoglycosides. Formerly called Xanthomonas maltophilia and Pseudomonas maltophilia.

stenoxenous (sten-ok′se-nus)
Denoting a parasite with a narrow host range; e.g., Eimeria (among the Coccidia), hookworm, biting and sucking lice. [steno- + G. xenos, a stranger, foreigner]

Stensen (Steno, Stenon, Stenonius)
Niels (Nicholaus), Danish anatomist, 1638–1686. See S. duct, S. foramen, S. plexus, S. veins, under vein.

Stent
Charles R., English dentist, &dag;1901. See s., S. graft.

stent
1. A thread, rod, or catheter, lying within the lumen of tubular structures, used to provide support during or after their anastomosis, or to assure patency of an intact but contracted lumen. 2. The process of placing a s.. 3. Device used to maintain a bodily orifice or cavity during skin grafting. 4. To immobilize a skin graft after placement. [Charles R. S.] expandable s. s. placed within the lumen of a structure, often percutaneously, that then shortens in its longitudinal dimension and increases its diameter, thereby increasing the inside dimension of the structure.




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