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Medical Dictionary


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vitellin (vi-tel′in)
A lipophosphoprotein combined with lecithin in the yolk of egg. SYN: lipovitellin, ovovitellin.

vitelline (vi-tel′in, -en)
Relating to the vitellus. See yolk sac.

vitellogenesis (vi-tel′lo-jen′e-sis, vi′te-lo-)
Formation of the yolk and its accumulation in the yolk sac. [L. vitellus, yolk, + G. genesis, production]

vitellogenin (vi′tel-o-jen′in)
An egg yolk precursor protein; production is stimulated by estrogens. [L. vitellus, egg yolk, + -gen + -in]

vitellolutein (vi-tel-o-loo′te-in)
Lutein from the yolk of egg.

vitellorubin (vi-tel-o-roo′bin)
A reddish pigment from the yolk of egg.

vitellose (vi-tel′os)
A protein fragment from vitellin.

vitellus (vi-tel′us)
SYN: yolk (1) . [L.] v. ovi yolk of egg; used in pharmacy for emulsifying oils and camphors.

vitiation (vish-e-a′shun)
A change that impairs utility or reduces efficiency. [L. vitiatio fr. vitio, pp. vitiatus, to corrupt, fr. vitium, vice]

vitiligines (vit-i-lij′i-nez)
Plural of vitiligo.

vitiliginous (vit-i-lij′i-nus)
Relating to or characterized by vitiligo.

vitiligo, pl .vitiligines (vit-i-li′go, vit-i-lij′i-nez)
The appearance on otherwise normal skin of nonpigmented white patches of varied sizes, often symmetrically distributed and usually bordered by hyperpigmented areas; hair in the affected areas is usually white. Epidermal melanocytes are completely lost in depigmented areas by an autoimmune process. SYN: acquired leukoderma. [L. a skin eruption, fr. vitium, blemish, vice] v. iridis small white patches in brown irides.

vitrectomy (vi-trek′to-me)
Removal of the vitreous by means of an instrument that simultaneously removes vitreous by suction and cutting, and replaces it with saline or some other fluid. [vitreous + G. ektome, excision] anterior v. removal of the central vitreous gel. posterior v. removal of the posterior cortical vitreous; sometimes the preretinal membranes are removed.

vitrein (vit′re-in)
A collagen-like protein that, with hyaluronic acid, accounts for the gel state of the vitreous humor. SYN: vitrosin.

vitreitis (vit-re-i′tis)
Inflammation of the corpus vitreum. SYN: hyalitis. [L. vitreus, glassy, + G. -itis, inflammation]

vitreo-
Vitreous. [L. vitreus, glassy]

vitreodentin (vit′re-o-den′tin)
Dentin of a particularly brittle character.

vitreoretinal (vit′re-o-ret′i-nal)
Pertaining to the retina and the vitreous body.

vitreoretinopathy (vit′re-o-ret′i-nop′a-the)
Retinopathy with vitreous complications. exudative v. [MIM*193220] a familial, slowly progressive ocular disease; characterized by posterior vitreous detachment, vitreous membranes, heterotopia of macula, retinal detachment, neovascularization, and recurrent hemorrhage.

vitreous (vit′re-us)
1. Glassy; resembling glass. 2. SYN: v. body. [L. vitreus, glassy, fr. vitrum, glass] persistent anterior hyperplastic primary v. a unilateral congenital abnormality occurring in full-term infants; characterized by a retrolental fibrovascular membrane formed by persistent primary v. with remnants of the hyaloid artery and tunica vasculosa lentis; associated with leukokoria, microphthalmos, shallow anterior chamber, and elongated ciliary processes. persistent posterior hyperplastic primary v. a unilateral congenital anomaly in full-term infants; associated with a congenital retinal fold and a v. membranous stalk containing remnants of the hyaloid artery. primary v. the v. first formed in the embryo between the optic cup and the lens vesicle, and later vascularized by the hyaloid artery and its branches. secondary v. avascular v. formed around the primary v.. tertiary v. v. fibrils derived from the neuroepithelium of the ciliary body and forming the ciliary zonule.

vitreum (vit′re-um)
SYN: vitreous body. [L. ntr. of vitreus, glassy]

vitrification (vit′ri-fi-ka′shun)
Conversion of dental porcelain (frit) to a glassy substance by heat and fusion. [L. vitrium, glassy, + facio, to make]

vitriol (vit′re-ol)
Any of the various salts of sulfuric acid, e.g., blue v. (cupric sulfate), green v. (ferrous sulfate), white v. (zinc sulfate). [L. vitreolus, glassy]

vitronectin (vit′ro-nek′tin)
A plasma glycoprotein involved in inflammatory and repair reactions at sites of tissue damage.

vitrosin (vit′ro-sin)
SYN: vitrein.

Vittaforma (ve-ta-for′ma)
A genus of microsporidia that can infect humans and can cause keratitis in the immunocompetent and disseminated infection in the immunocompromised; formerly Nosema.

vivarium, pl .vivaria (vi-var′e-um, -a)
Quarters in which animals are housed, particularly animals used in medical research. [L. vivarius, pertaining to living creatures]

vivi-
Living. [L. vivus, alive]

vividialysis (viv′i-di-al′i-sis)
Removal by dialysis, as by lavage of peritoneal cavity.

vividiffusion (viv′i-di-fu′zhun)
Archaic term for a method by which circulating blood may be submitted to dialysis outside the body and returned to the circulation without exposure to the air or to any noxious influences; the principle used in the performance of renal dialysis with the artificial kidney. [vivi- + diffusion]

vivification (viv′i-fi-ka′shun)
SYN: revivification (2) . [L. vivifico, pp. -atus, fr. vivus, alive, + facio, to make]

viviparity (viv′i-par′i-te)
The quality or state of being viviparous, i.e., producing offspring that are living at the time of birth. SYN: zoogony.

viviparous (vi-vip′a-rus)
Giving birth to living young, in distinction to oviparous, or egg-laying. SYN: zoogonous. [vivi- + L. pario, to bear]

viviperception (viv′i-per-sep′shun)
Observation of the vital processes in the organism without the aid of vivisection. [vivi- + perception]

vivisect (viv-i-sekt′)
To practice vivisection.

vivisection (viv-i-sek′shun)
Any cutting operation on a living animal for purposes of experimentation; often extended to denote any form of animal experimentation. [vivi- + section]

vivisectionist, vivisector (vi-vi-sek′shun-ist, -tor; vi-vi-sek′tor)
One who practices vivisection.

Vladimiroff
Vladimir D., Russian surgeon, 1837–1903. See Mikulicz-V. amputation, V.-Mikulicz amputation.

VLDL
Abbreviation for very low density lipoprotein. See lipoprotein.

VMA
Abbreviation for vanillylmandelic acid.

V-max
See Vmax.

VMC
Abbreviation for void metal composite.

V-MI
Abbreviation for Volpe-Manhold Index.

vocal (vo′kal)
Pertaining to the voice or the organs of speech. [L. vocalis]

vocal fry (vo′kal fri)
Phonation at an unnaturally low frequency resulting in low-frequency popping and ticking sounds. SYN: glottalization.

Vogel law
See under law.

Voges
Otto, German physician, *1867. See V.-Proskauer reaction.

Vogt
Alfred, Swiss ophthalmologist, 1879–1943. See V.-Koyanagi syndrome.

Vogt
Cécile, German neurologist, 1875–1962. See V. syndrome.

Vogt
Heinrich W., German neurologist, *1875. See Spielmeyer-V. disease.

Vogt
Karl C., German physiologist, 1817–1895. See V. angle.

Vogt
Oskar, German neurologist, 1870–1959. See V. syndrome.

Vogt cephalodactyly
SYN: type II acrocephalosyndactyly.

Vohwinkel
H.H., 20th century German dermatologist. See V. syndrome.

voice (voys)
The sound made by vibration of the vocal folds caused by air passing out through the larynx and upper respiratory tract, the vocal folds being approximated. SYN: vox. [L. vox] amphoric v. a v. sound having a hollow, blowing character, heard over a pulmonary cavity when the patient speaks or whispers. SYN: amphorophony. bronchial v. SYN: bronchophony. cavernous v. the hollow or metallic v. sound heard over a pulmonary cavity. epigastric v. the delusion of a v. proceeding from the epigastrium. eunuchoid v. high-pitched v. in the adult male resembling the v. of a young boy; usually functional in origin. myxedema v. the forced, rough, raucous v. of subjects of myxedema, probably due to myxedematous thickening of the vocal folds.

void (voyd)
To evacuate urine or feces. flow v. in magnetic resonance imaging, the absence of signal from blood whose activated protons leave a region before their magnetization is measured. SEE ALSO: signal v.. signal v. in magnetic resonance imaging, a region emitting no radiofrequency signal, because there are no activated protons in the region (such as flowing blood), because a different element predominates, particularly calcium, or because of uncompensated dephasing, such as occurs at air-tissue interfaces in the lung.

void metal composite (VMC)
A porous metal structure that enables tissue growth within the openings to establish long-term attachment between prosthesis and tissue.

vol.
Abbreviation for [L.] volatilis, volatile.

vola (vo′la)
Palm of the hand or sole of the foot. [L.]

volar (vo′lar) [TA]
Referring to the vola; denoting either the palm of the hand or sole of the foot. SYN: volaris [TA] .

volaris (vo-la′ris) [TA]
SYN: volar.

volatile (vol.) (vol′a-til)
1. Tending to evaporate rapidly. 2. Tending toward violence, explosiveness, or rapid change. [L. volatilis, fr. volo, to fly]

volatilization (vol′a-til-i-za′shun)
SYN: evaporation. [fr. L. volatilis, volatile, fr. volo, pp. volatus, to fly]

volatilize (vol′a-til-iz)
SYN: evaporate.

Volhard
Franz, German physician, 1872–1950. See V. test.

volition (vo-lish′un)
The conscious impulse to perform any act or to abstain from its performance; voluntary action. [L. volo,, to wish]

volitional (vo-lish′un-al)
Done by an act of will; relating to volition.

Volkmann
Alfred W., German physiologist, 1800–1877. See V. canals, under canal.

Volkmann
Richard, German surgeon, 1830–1889. See V. cheilitis, V. contracture, V. spoon.

volley (vol′e)
A synchronous group of impulses induced simultaneously by artificial stimulation of either nerve fibers or muscle fibers. [Fr. volée, fr. L. volo, to fly]

Vollmer
Herman, U.S. pediatrician, 1896–1959. See V. test.

Volpe
Anthony R., U.S. dentist, *1932. See V.-Manhold Index.

volsella (vol-sel′a)
SYN: vulsella forceps. [see vulsella]




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