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Medical Dictionary


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


wen (wen)
Old term for pilar cyst. [A.S.]

Wenckebach
Karel F., Dutch internist, 1864–1940. See W. block, W. period, W. phenomenon.

Wenzel
Joseph, German anatomist and physiologist, 1768–1808. See W. ventricle.

Wepfer
Johann J., 1620–1695. See W. glands, under gland.

Werdnig
Guido, Austrian neurologist, 1862–1919. See W.-Hoffmann disease, W.-Hoffmann muscular atrophy.

WERLHOF
Paul G., German physician, 1699–1767. See Werlhof disease.

Wermer
Paul L., U.S. internist, 1898–1975. See W. syndrome.

Wernekinck, Werneking
Friedrich C.G., German anatomist and physician, 1798–1835. See W. commissure, W. decussation.

Werner
F.F., early 20th century German chemist. See W. test.

Werner
Otto, German physician, *1879. See W. syndrome.

Wernicke
Karl, German neurologist, 1848–1905. See W. aphasia, W. area, W. center, W. disease, W. encephalopathy, W. field, W. radiation, W. reaction, W. region, W. sign, W. syndrome, W. zone, W.-Korsakoff encephalopathy, W.-Korsakoff syndrome.

Wertheim
Ernst, Austrian gynecologist, 1864–1920. See W. operation.

Werther
J., 20th century German physician. See W. disease.

West
Charles, English physician, 1816–1898. See W. syndrome.

West
John B., Australian-U.S. pulmonary physiologist, *1928.

Westberg
Friedrich, 19th century German physician. See W. space.

Westergren
Alf, Swedish physician, *1891. See W. method.

Western blot, Western blotting
SYN: W. analysis.

Westphal
Karl F.O., German neurologist, 1833–1890. See W. pupillary reflex, W.-Piltz phenomenon, Edinger-W. nucleus.

Wetzel
Norman C., U.S. pediatrician, *1897. See W. grid.

Wever
Ernest Glen, U.S. psychologist, *1902. See W.-Bray phenomenon.

Weyers
Helmut, 20th century German pediatrician. See W.-Thier syndrome.

WF
Abbreviation for Working Formulation for Clinical Usage.

Wharton
Thomas, English anatomist and physician, 1614–1673. See W. duct, W. jelly.

wheal (hwel)
A circumscribed, evanescent papule or irregular plaque of edema of the skin, appearing as an urticarial lesion, slightly reddened, often changing in size and shape and extending to adjacent areas, and usually accompanied by intense itching; produced by intradermal injection or test, or by exposure to allergenic substances in susceptible persons; also encountered in dermatitis herpetiformis (Darier sign). SYN: hives (2) , welt. [A.S. hwele]

wheat germ oil (hwet jerm)
An oil obtained by expression from the germ of the wheat seed, Triticum aestivum (family Gramineae); one of the richest sources of natural vitamin E; used as a nutritional supplement.

Wheatstone
Charles, English physicist, 1802–1875. See W. bridge.

wheel (hwel)
A circular frame or disk designed to revolve around an axis. Burlew w. SYN: Burlew disk.

Wheeler
Henry Lord, U.S. chemist, 1867–1914. See W.-Johnson test.

Wheeler
John M., U.S. ophthalmologist, 1879–1938. See W. method.

wheeze (hwez)
1. To breathe with difficulty and noisily. 2. A whistling, squeaking, musical, or puffing sound made on exhalation by air passing through the fauces, glottis, or narrowed tracheobronchial airways. [A.S. hwesan] asthmatoid w. a puffing or musical sound heard on exhalation in front of the patient's open mouth in a case of foreign body in the trachea or a bronchus.

whewellite (hwa′wel-it)
A monohydrate of calcium oxalate; found in renal calculi. Cf.:weddellite. [William Whewell, Eng. philosopher (1794–1866), + -ite]

whey (hwa)
The watery part of milk remaining after the separation of the casein. SYN: serum lactis. [A.S. hwaeg] alum w. w. produced by curdling milk by means of powdered alum. w. protein w. protein.

whiplash (hwip′lash)
See w. injury.

Whipple
Allen O., U.S. surgeon, 1881–1963. See W. operation.

Whipple
George H., U.S. pathologist and Nobel laureate, 1878–1976. See W. disease.

whipworm (hwip′werm)
See Trichuris trichiura.

whisky, whiskey (hwis′ke)
An alcoholic liquid obtained by the distillation of the fermented mash of wholly or partly malted cereal grains, containing 47 to 53% by volume of C2H5OH, at 15.56°C; it must have been stored in charred wood containers for not less than 2 years. The various grains used in the manufacture of w. are barley, maize, rye, and wheat. [Gael, usquebaugh, water of life]

whisper (hwis′per)
To speak without phonation, as with an open posterior part of the glottis. [A.S. hwisprian]

whistle (hwis′l)
1. A sound made by forcing air through a narrow opening. 2. An instrument for producing a w.. [A.S. hwistle] Galton w. a cylindrical w., attached to a compressible bulb, with a screw attachment that changes the frequency; used to test the hearing.

Whitaker
Robert, Br. surgeon, *1939. See W. test.

White
Paul Dudley, U.S. cardiologist, 1886–1973. See Lee-W. method, Wolff-Parkinson-W. syndrome.

white (hwit)
The color resulting from commingling of all the rays of the spectrum; the color of chalk or of snow. SYN: albicans (1) . [A.S. hwit] w. of eye the visible portion of the sclera.

Whitehead
Walter, English surgeon, 1840–1913. See W. deformity, W. operation.

whitehead (hwit′hed)
1. SYN: milium. 2. SYN: closed comedo.

whitepox (hwit′poks)
SYN: alastrim.

whites (hwits)
Colloquialism for leukorrhea or blennorrhea.

whiting (hwit′ing)
Chalk (CaCO3) used for polishing metals or plastic appliances.

whitlockite (hwit′lok-it)
SYN: tribasic calcium phosphate. [Herbert P. Whitlock, Am. mineralogist (*1868), + -ite]

whitlow (hwit′lo)
Purulent infection through a perionychial fold causing an abscess of the bulbous distal end of a finger. SYN: felon. [M.E. whitflawe] herpetic w. painful herpes simplex virus infection of a finger from direct inoculation of the unprotected perionychial fold, often accompanied by lymphangitis and regional adenopathy, lasting up to several weeks; most common in physicians, dentists, and nurses as a result of exposure to the virus in a patient's mouth. thecal w. suppurative lesion of distal phalanx; may involve tendon sheath and bone.

Whitman
Royal, U.S. surgeon, 1857–1946. See W. frame.

Whitmore
Alfred, English surgeon, 1876–1946. See W. disease.

Whitnall
Samuel E., English anatomist, 1876–1952. See W. tubercle.

WHO
Abbreviation for World Health Organization.

whoop (hoop)
The loud sonorous inspiration in pertussis with which the paroxysm of coughing terminates, due to spasm of the larynx (glottis). systolic w. SYN: systolic honk.

whorl (hwerl)
1. A turn of the spiral cochlea of the ear. 2. SYN: vortex of heart. 3. A turn of a concha nasalis. 4. SYN: verticil. 5. An area of hair growing in a radial manner suggesting whirling or twisting. SYN: vortex (2) . See hair whorls. 6. One of the distinguishing patterns comprising the Galton system of classification of fingerprints. SYN: digital w.. coccygeal w. SYN: vortex coccygeus. digital w. SYN: w. (6) . hair whorls [TA] a spiral arrangement of the hairs, as at the crown of the head. SYN: vortices pilorum [TA] .

whorled (hwerld)
Marked by or arranged in whorls. SEE ALSO: vorticose, turbinate, convoluted, verticillate.

Wickham
Louis-Frédéric, French dermatologist, 1860–1913. See W. striae, under stria.

Widal
Georges F.I., French physician, 1862–1929. See W. reaction, W. syndrome, Gruber-W. reaction, Hayem-W. syndrome.

wideband (wid-band)
A broad array of sound frequencies as opposed to a narrow array of frequencies.

widow's peak
A sharp point of hair growth in the midline of the anterior scalp margin, usually resulting from recession of hair of the temple areas, or occurring as a congenital configuration of scalp hair.

width (width, with)
Wideness; the distance from one side of an object or area to the other. orbital w. the distance between the dacryon and the farthest point on the anterior edge of the outer border of the orbit (Broca), or between the latter point and the junction of the frontolacrimal suture and the posterior edge of the lacrimal groove. window w. the range of CT numbers (in Hounsfield units) included in the gray scale video display of the CT image, ranging from 1 to 2000 or 3000, depending on the type of machine. Also, the range of electromagnetic energies passed by an electronic screening module of an imaging device, as by a scintillation camera. SEE ALSO: window level.

Wiedemann
Hans Rudolf, German pediatrician, *1915. See Beckwith-W. syndrome.

Wiener
H. See tract of Münzer and W..

Wigand
Justus Heinrich, German obstetrician and gynecologist, 1769–1817. See W. maneuver.

Wilde
Sir William R.W., Irish oculist and otologist, 1815–1876. See W. cords, under cord, W. triangle.

Wilder
Helenor C., 20th century U.S. scientist. See W. stain for reticulum.

Wilder
Joseph F., U.S. neuropsychiatrist, 1895–1976.

Wilder
William H., U.S. ophthalmologst, 1860–1935. See W. sign.

Wildermuth
Hermann A., German psychiatrist, 1852–1907. See W. ear.

Wildervanck
L.S., 20th century Dutch geneticist. See W. syndrome.

wildfire (wild′fir)
SYN: fogo selvagem.

Wilhelmy
Ludwig F., German scientist, 1812–1864. See W. balance.

Wilkie
David P.D., Scottish surgeon, 1882–1938. See W. artery, W. disease.

Wilkinson
Daryl Sheldon, 20th century English dermatologist. See Sneddon-W. disease.

Willebrand
E.A. von. See von W..

Willett
J. Abernethy, English obstetrician, &dag;1932. See W. forceps.

Willi
Heinrich, 20th century Swiss pediatrician. See Prader-W. syndrome.

Williams
Anna W., U.S. bacteriologist, 1863–1955. See W. stain, Park-W. fixative.

Williams
J.C.P., 20th century New Zealand cardiologist. See W. syndrome.

Williamson
Carl S., U.S. surgeon, 1896–1952. See Mann-W. operation, Mann-W. ulcer.

Willis
Thomas, English physician, 1621–1675. See W. centrum nervosum, W. cords, under cord, W. pancreas, W. paracusis, W. pouch, circle of W., accessorius willisii, chordae willisii, under chorda.

Williston
Samuel Wendell, U.S. paleontologist, 1852–1918. See W. law.

willow (wil′o)
A tree of the genus Salix; the bark of several species, especially S. fragilis, is a source of salicin. [A.S. welig]

Wilms
Max, German surgeon, 1867–1918. See W. tumor.

Wilson
Clifford, English physician, *1906. See Kimmelstiel-W. disease, Kimmelstiel-W. syndrome.

Wilson
James, English anatomist, physiologist, and surgeon, 1765–1821. See W. muscle.

Wilson
Miriam G., U.S. pediatrician, *1922. See W.-Mikity syndrome.

Wilson
Samuel A. Kinnier, English neurologist, 1878–1937. See W. disease.

Wilson
Sir William J.E., English dermatologist, 1809–1884. See W. disease.

Wilson method
See under method.

windage (win′dej)
Internal injury with no surface lesion, caused by collision with the pressure of compressed air or with an object propelled by compressed air.




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