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Medical Dictionary


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wreath (reth)
A structure resembling a twisted or entwined band or a garland. [A.S. wraeth, a bandage] ciliary w. SYN: corona ciliaris.

Wright
Basil Martin, 20th century British physician. See W. respirometer.

Wright
James Homer, U.S. pathologist, 1869–1928. See W. stain.

Wright
Marmaduke Burr, U.S. obstetrician, 1803–1879. See W. version.

wrightine (rit′en)
SYN: conessine.

wrinkle (ring′kl)
A furrow, fold, or crease in the skin, particularly with increasing occurrence as a result of sun exposure or, in perioral skin, cigarette smoking; associated with degeneration of dermal elastic tissue.

Wrisberg
Heinrich A., German anatomist and gynecologist, 1739–1808. See W. cartilage, W. ganglia, under ganglion, W. ligament, W. nerve, W. tubercle.

wrist (rist) [TA]
The proximal segment of the hand consisting of the carpal bones and the associated soft parts. SYN: carpus (1) [TA] . [A.S. w. joint, ankle joint] w.-drop paralysis of the extensors of the w. and fingers; most often caused by lesion of the radial nerve. SYN: carpoptosis, carpoptosia, drop hand.

wryneck (ri′nek)
SYN: torticollis.

Wuchereria (voo-ker-e′re-a)
A genus of filarial nematodes (family Onchocercidae, superfamily Filarioidea) characterized by adult forms that live chiefly in lymphatic vessels and produce large numbers of embryos or microfilariae that circulate in the bloodstream (microfilaremia), often appearing in the peripheral blood at regular intervals. The extreme form of this infection (wuchereriasis or filariasis) is elephantiasis or pachydermia. W. bancrofti the bancroftian filaria, a species endemic in South Pacific islands, coastal China, India, and Burma, and throughout tropical Africa and northeastern South America (including certain Caribbean islands); transmitted to humans (apparently the only definitive host) by mosquitoes, especially Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes pseudoscutellaris, but also by several other species of Culex, Aedes, Anopheles, and Mansonia, depending on the specific geographic area; adults are white, 40–100 mm cylindroid, threadlike worms, and the microfilariae are ensheathed, with rounded anterior end and tapered, nonnucleated tail; the adult worms inhabit the larger lymphatic vessels ( e.g., in the extremities (especially lower), breasts, spermatic cord, and retroperitoneal tissues) and the sinuses of lymph nodes ( e.g., the popliteal, femoral, and inguinal groups, and also the epitrochlear and axillary nodes), where they sometimes cause temporary obstruction to the flow of lymph and slight or moderate degrees of inflammation. W. malayi former name for Brugia malayi.

wuchereriasis (voo′ker-e-ri′a-sis)
Infection with worms of the genus Wuchereria. SEE ALSO: filariasis.

Wurster
Casimir, German chemist, 1856–1913. See W. reagent, W. test.

Wyburn-Mason
Roger, British physician. See Wyburn-Mason syndrome.

Wyman
Jeffries, U.S. biochemist, 1901–1995. See Monod-W.-Changeux model.




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